Home A - Z FAQ Bookstore Art Prints Online Library Discussion Forum Muir Weather Maps Lodging About Search
CalHotels.US--online reservations now CalHotels.US Lowest Hotel Rates Guaranteed. Click Here For Yours!
Hotel photos, maps, reviews, & discount rates.

U.S. Hotels in California (Yosemite, L. A., San Francisco ), AL, AK, AR, AS, AZ, CA, CO, CT, DC, DE, FL, FM, GA, GU, HI, ID, IL, IN, IA, KS, KY, LA, ME, MD, MA, MI, MN, MS, MO, MT, NE, NH, NJ, NY, OK, NV, MH, MP, NM, NC, ND, OH, OR, PA, PR, PW, RI, SC, SD, TN, TX, UT, VT, VA, VI WA, WV, WI, WY

[Yosemite]

packable shoe covers for crossing streams??

Hiking, backpacking, running, biking, climbing, rafting, and other human-powered activities in Yosemite National Park

Moderators: Wickett, dan

packable shoe covers for crossing streams??

Postby skweezal » Sat Jan 08, 2011 10:08 pm

I know this may be an odd question, but I am trying to find something flexible and foldable and packable that is sort of a waterproof covering for your shoes/hiking boots. I hike and have a few creeks to cross where there are no stones to hop on...you must wade! I think if I could find something I could carry with me that was very portable and could be a waterproof protector was I crossed the creeks, that would be great. Is there anything like that out on the market?? Something you could use as a shoe cover while crossing the stream (maybe calf high) and then remove on the other side and go on your merry way till the next creek crossing!

Any thoughts?
sk
skweezal
First-timer
First-timer
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sat Jan 08, 2011 10:03 pm
Location: USA

Postby AlmostThere » Sun Jan 09, 2011 1:09 am

Fisherman have those. They can be expensive and/or heavy sometimes.

And then there are contractor bags - if you're not crossing on sharp rocks and don't run them into sticks, they're pretty durable for trash bags. Make good ground cloths too.

Or you can take off your socks, wade in shoes, drain well, put on socks, and go.
AlmostThere
Veteran-poster
Veteran-poster
 
Posts: 1697
Joined: Fri May 15, 2009 6:57 pm
Location: Central Valley California

Re: packable shoe covers for crossing streams??

Postby dan » Sun Jan 09, 2011 1:38 am

What I often do is take my socks off and cross the stream in my boots sans socks. Lightweight boots dry pretty quickly. My wife uses those lightweight Crocs. For women, they also make models with attractive styling that have the side benefit of less weight (not so clunky looking).

Also, it often pays to take your pack off and spend just a few minutes going a few hundred feet up and down the stream and find a log or rock crossing.
User avatar
dan
Veteran-poster
Veteran-poster
 
Posts: 773
Joined: Sat Jan 20, 2007 9:06 pm
Location: California, USA

Postby Wickett » Sun Jan 09, 2011 7:24 am

I use my Five Finger Vibrams. They are light, flexible and I normally bring them with me on my trips. They are great for climbing on the granite too. Way stickier than normal shoes or boots.
Wickett
Veteran-poster
Veteran-poster
 
Posts: 263
Joined: Fri Aug 15, 2008 11:34 am
Location: Sacramento

Postby balzaccom » Sun Jan 09, 2011 8:31 am

It's not a quick as you suggest, but we use Crocs. They are very lightweight, and we keep them strapped to the outside of our packs. When we hit a stream, we take of our boots AND socks, slip on the Crocs, and cross. The put everthing back on again.

And the Crocs make great camp shoes, as well--easy on the feet after a long day in boots. We've even hiked a few hundred yards in them, when we faced multiple stream crossing on a short section of trail.
balzaccom
Veteran-poster
Veteran-poster
 
Posts: 1174
Joined: Sat Nov 22, 2008 7:51 am
Location: Napa CA

Second Vote for Croc's

Postby SteveH » Sun Jan 09, 2011 2:28 pm

Just gotta make sure they fit semi snug and heel strap will hold em on your feet when wading. Great camp shoes at end of day and I've worn em fishing at some lakes so can wade out into water enough to back cast with fly rod.
/r
SteveH
SteveH
Regular
Regular
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Wed Feb 06, 2008 11:01 am

Postby AlmostThere » Sun Jan 09, 2011 6:29 pm

Also, there are stream crossings, and then there are early season adventures in sticking your feet into the unknown because the water is flowing high and fast. If you can't see where you are walking it's best to leave your shoes on - take out the socks and put them back on. You won't run as much risk of cutting your trip really short and limping back to the car that way.

Sometimes the best stream crossing shoes are boots, or shoes. Some trips it's easier to justify the weight of a pair of old sneakers.
AlmostThere
Veteran-poster
Veteran-poster
 
Posts: 1697
Joined: Fri May 15, 2009 6:57 pm
Location: Central Valley California

Postby orion » Mon Jan 10, 2011 2:43 pm

have you considered gaiters?

if you have waterproof boots, these or something like them can help keep the water out for a stream crossing, but maybe not for a waist-deep long crossing:
http://www.rei.com/product/778002

also good for gravelly scree or glissading on snow.

otherwise, any sports sandal will do, but you have to stop to take boots off and on.
orion
Veteran-poster
Veteran-poster
 
Posts: 171
Joined: Sun Jan 17, 2010 4:02 pm

Postby Kpeter » Wed Jan 26, 2011 10:18 pm

Crocs work for me, chiefly because they double as my camp shoes.
Kpeter
Regular
Regular
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2010 2:04 pm

Postby hotrod4x5 » Thu Jan 27, 2011 8:43 am

Lots of crocs, anyone using sandals like Teva? I've a couple pairs of those, but no crocs.
hotrod4x5
Veteran-poster
Veteran-poster
 
Posts: 218
Joined: Tue May 11, 2010 9:37 am
Location: Riverside, CA

Postby AlmostThere » Thu Jan 27, 2011 9:35 am

I have Tevas... I like the croc knockoffs better for some crossings, they protect the top of the foot a little better and make better camp shoes, since they don't hold water and won't be damp by evening. A friend's Tevas froze solid overnight after a late afternoon creek crossing.
AlmostThere
Veteran-poster
Veteran-poster
 
Posts: 1697
Joined: Fri May 15, 2009 6:57 pm
Location: Central Valley California

Postby hotrod4x5 » Thu Jan 27, 2011 9:42 am

AlmostThere wrote:I have Tevas... I like the croc knockoffs better for some crossings, they protect the top of the foot a little better and make better camp shoes, since they don't hold water and won't be damp by evening. A friend's Tevas froze solid overnight after a late afternoon creek crossing.
Ahh good point about Tevas and water retention.
hotrod4x5
Veteran-poster
Veteran-poster
 
Posts: 218
Joined: Tue May 11, 2010 9:37 am
Location: Riverside, CA

Postby orion » Thu Jan 27, 2011 11:31 am

i found these crocs to work the best:

http://www.kittyhell.com/wp-content/upl ... s-pink.jpg
orion
Veteran-poster
Veteran-poster
 
Posts: 171
Joined: Sun Jan 17, 2010 4:02 pm

Postby AlmostThere » Thu Jan 27, 2011 11:35 am

orion wrote:i found these crocs to work the best:

http://www.kittyhell.com/wp-content/upl ... s-pink.jpg


Whatever floats your boat, man. Mine cost five bucks and don't show up on satellite images.
AlmostThere
Veteran-poster
Veteran-poster
 
Posts: 1697
Joined: Fri May 15, 2009 6:57 pm
Location: Central Valley California

Crocs

Postby KC » Thu Jan 27, 2011 11:31 pm

Invested in a cheap pair of knockoff crocs after using Tevas for a good while. The crocs are definitely lighter, dry more quickly, and work great as camp shoes. Only bad thing about them is they are not quite as good for climbing and hiking as Tevas.

Five Finger Vibrams sound interesting since they appear to have a bit more utility than the crocs and seem to be an ounce or two lighter.
KC
Veteran-poster
Veteran-poster
 
Posts: 106
Joined: Tue Jun 01, 2010 12:11 am

Next

Return to Yosemite Hiking & Backpacking

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests

cron