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[woodcut of John Muir] John Muir Writings

Our National Parks, by John Muir (1901)


Appendix


I. National Parks

Map
No.
NameLocationEstablished Characteristic
Features
Area: Acres Private
Claims:
Acres11
Revenue
1908
Appropria-
tion, (1901)
Visitors
1908
1Yellowstone1Wyoming7 Mch. 1,18723Unique volcanic mountain scenery 22,142,720.00None$4,125.65$73,000.0018 19,542
2Hot Springs1Arkansas June 16,18803Medicinal springs, wooded mountains 911.63None28,090.00None 898,00422
14,418
3Sequoia1California Sept. 25, 18903"Big Trees" 161,597.003,716.961259.72 15,550.001,251
4Yosemite1 8California Oct. 1, 18903Unique glacial valleys and snow mountains 719,622.0019,827.001318,260.98 30,000.008,850
5Gen. Grant1California Oct. 1, 18903"Big Trees" 2,536.00160.0012None 2,000.001,773
6Casa Grande1Arizona June 22, 18924Prehistoric dwellings 480.009NoneNone900.00 No count
7Mt. Rainier2Washington Mch. 2, 18993Snow peak and glaciers 207,360.0018.20141,064.84 28,000.00192,826
8Crater Lake1Oregon May 22, 19023Lake in extinct volcano 159,360.00101,914.2215.00 3,000.005,27523
9Platt6Oklahoma July 1, 19023Mineral springs848.22 None72.0016,000.0020 26,00024
10Wind Cave1So. Dakota Jan. 9, 19033Caverns10,522.00 719.3915400.002,500.00 3,17124
11Sully’s Hill5No. Dakota June 2, 19045Wooded hills and lake 780.00NoneNoneNone21 25023
12Mesa Verde1
ColoradoJune 29, 19063Prehistoric dwellings 42,376.002,080.0016None 7,500.008025
 5-mile strip
surrounding
Mesa Verde1
ColoradoJune 29, 1906Prehistoric dwellings 175,360.0050,346.1417    
    TOTALS 3,624,9472.8578,781.9111$52,088.19 $178,450.00 
13*GlacierMontana Pending 915,000.006,000.00    

Name, location, and establishment
1 Constituted from unpatented lands of the public domain.
2 Constituted from unpatented lands of National Forests.
3 By direct Act of Congress.
4 By executive order authorized by Sundry Civil Act, March 2, 1889.
5 By executive order authorized by Act of April 27, 1904, amending agreement with Devil’s Lake Indians. A cash purchase.
6 Cash purchase from Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians, acts of July 1, 1902, and April 21, 1904. Renamed in honor of late Senator Platt of Connecticut, long member of Indian Affairs Committee, by Act of June 29, 1906.
7 A small percentage of park laps over into Montana and Idaho.
8 Yosemite Valley set aside June 30, 1864, as a State park. Receded to United Sates by California, March 3, 1905, and accepted by acts of Congress, March 3, 1905, June 11,1906.
9 Extension recommended to include neighboring ruins.
10 Extension recommended by Superintendent to include lower slopes of mountain to supply winter sanctuary for game.

Private Lands:
11 Three areas are included in total areas of parks. Total private claims amount to about 2.8% of total park areas. State school lands may be exchanged if same lie within any government reservation, under Section 2275 Revised Statutes as amended in 1891.
12 Secretary of Interior repeatedly recommended purchase of claims, but Congress has failed to act on his bills.
13 About 2% of park area is patented, including some of finest timber.
14 This is a placer mine patent. There are also 178 unperfected claims.
15 Establishing act allows claimants to exchange for outside lands under forest lieu land laws. No exchanges to date. State school lands have been exchanged.
16 Of this 360 acres are patented. Remainder in unperfected claims and school lands. Workable coal underlies whole park.
17 Of this 31,535.98 acres are patented. Remainder as noted in Note 16.


Finances (revenues are from leases and concessions):
18 Of this $65,000 is for "maintenance and repair of improvements," to be expended by War Department.
19 Of this $25,000 is for road building under War Department.
20 Of this $15,000 is toward a sewer if city of Sulphur provides a like amount.
21 Park is supervised by an Indian school officer stationed in the neighborhood.

Visitors:
22 First figure is number of baths, free and paid. Second figure is number of persons visiting the mountain observation tower at 25 cents each.
23 Estimated.
24 Includes visitors from outside the immediate neighborhood. Park also serves city of Sulphur.
25 No carriage road to this park. Horse trail, steep and dangerous, 10 miles.
* Proposed park. Bill to establish passed both branches in 60th Congress, but no in identical form. The bills failed to each a conference vote. Tract is now in a National Forest.

II. Statutary Provisions Relating to National Parks

NameDepartments Allied in Control1 Penalties for Misdemeanors10Protection of
"Natural Condition" specified19
Special Privleges Allowed
YellowstoneWar3 4Yes11 YesHotels, etc.23
Hot Springs2NoneYes12 NoNumerous24
SequoiaWar3None13 YesHotels, etc.25
YosemiteWar3None13 YesHotels, etc.25
Gen. GrantWar3None13 YesHotels, etc.25
Casa Grande2Smithsonian5 None14Yes20None
Mt. RainierWar4: Agriculture6 None13YesHotels26: Mining27
Crater LakeNoneYes15 No21Hotels26: Mining28
PlattNone7Yes16 No22Water29
Wind CaveJustice8Yes17 No22Hotels: Cavern30
Sully’s HillNoneNone14 NoNone
Mesa VerdeNone9Yes18 YesScientific Research31

Nomenclature and Management:
1 Interior Department is in all cases the custodian.
2 All are specifically called "parks" in the establishing acts or their amendments except Hot Springs and Casa Grande Ruin. These are termed "reservations."
3 Policed by troops on request of Interior Department (Sundry Civil Acts of March 3, 1883, and June 6, 1900). Paid for from Army appropriation. Same Superintendent and guard cares for both Sequoia and Gen. Grant Parks.
4 Road construction by Army Engineers (Act of June 6, 1900).
5 Scientific excavations and protective works placed under Smithsonian Institution by Sundry Civil Act of June 30, 1906.
6 At present the Supervisor of Rainier National Forest acts as superintendent of park. Forest surrounds the park. Forest rangers police park in part.
7 Superintendent of park recommends a military guard in summer.
8 The U. S. Marshall for So. Dakota acts voluntarily as advisory superintendent.
9 Scientific excavations and protective works undertaken voluntarily by Smithsonian Institution at request of Interior Department.

Misdemeanor Penalties:
10 All National Forest and National Park employees given power of arrest for violation of laws and regulations by Act of Feb. 6, 1905, reënacted by Agriculture Appropriation Act of March 3, 1905. Act of March 3, 1875, provides a fine up to $500 or imprisonment up to one year for cutting or injuring trees or fences, or for unauthorized pasturing on any reserved public lands. Act of June 3, 1878, as amended August 4, 1892, forbids unlawful timber cutting on public lands, the fine being $100 to $1000. Section 5391 Revised Statues and Act of July 7, 1898, makes offences on U. S. property punishable under the law of the State where committed, if such law exists, in cases where there is no U. S. law to cover same. See 11, 12, 13.
11 Special Act of May 7, 1894, "to protect birds and animals in Yellowstone National Park, and to punish crimes in said park." Fine up to $1000 or imprisonment up to 2 years, or both, with costs. Wyoming State laws apply where U. S. laws are deficient.
12 Fine up to $100 and costs in certain cases on a portion of the reservation (Act of April 20, 1904, amended March 2, 1907). City ordinances and State laws apply in some cases.
13 Violators of rules governing park may only be ejected. State laws do not cover sufficiently. In the case of the Yosemite there is no U. S. Commissioner within 100 miles.
14 Rules and regulations for government are required by law in connection with all National Parks except Casa Grande and Sully’s Hill.
15 Fine up to $500 or imprisonment up to 1 year and liability for all damages.
16 Fine of $5 to $100 or imprisonment up to 6 months.
17 Fine up to $1000, or imprisonment up to 1 year, or both.
18 Fine up to $1000, or imprisonment up to 1 year, and obligation to restore removed property.

Preservation Terms:
19 The preservation of the park in its natural condition is required by law on 7 of the 12 parks.
20 Establishing act specifies "protection of said ruin and of the ancient city of which it is a part." Custodian provided annually by Sundry Civil Act.
21 Custodian required by establishing act to "cause adequate measures to be taken for the preservation of the natural objects" and of timer, game, and fish.
22 Requirement might be implied, however, from general terms of establishing act.

Privileges:
23 Act of August 3, 1894, amended March 2, 1907, redefined leasing terms, limiting area to 10 acres, or where more than one location was granted one person or concern, not over 20 acres all told. It forbade leasing any natural wonders, or any land within a fixed distance of chief objects.
24 Railway locations, revocable by Congress, granted by acts of March 3, 1877, and Oct. 19, 1888. Another railway right of Dec. 21, 1893, was defaulted. City reservoir site granted by Act of August 7, 1894. An observation tower with elevator, admission 25 cents, leased a site on the mountain under Act of March 19, 1898. Hotel, bath-house, and sanatorium locations allotted, and hot water from springs sold pursuant to sundry acts of Congress.
25 Revocable locations to power-plants, water-supply works, pole lines, conduits, etc. authorized by Act of Feb. 15, 1901, when not deemed "incompatible with the public interest." Hetch-Hetchy storage basin grant to San Francisco made hereunto, May, 1908.
26 Hotel leases unlimited as to area or time. Railways may be built into, not through, park.
27 Mining claims proved in good faith prior to Act of May 27, 1908, may be worked under regulation of department. 178 such claims in park.
28 Mining claims may be located and worked under regulation of department. Such claims do not carry a fee title to land here.
29 Village of Sulphur supplied from creek under department regulation.
30 Establishing act permits renting cavern, the chief natural feature of the park. Mining claims antedating park would be protected.
31A bill introduced in 60th Congress by Secretary of Interior to allow hotel and similar leases failed to become law.
(Bill now pending to create Glacier National Park, Montana, allows 20-year leases for private cottages, and also allows removal of mature timber "for the protection and improvement of the park." No penalties for misdemeanor are provided.)

III. National Monuments1

Map
No.
NameLocationEstablished Characteristic FeaturesArea: Acres2
14Devil’s TowerWyomingSept. 24, 1906 Example of erosion1,152.91
15Petrified ForestArizona Dec. 8, 1906Silicified mesozoic forest remains 60,776.02
16Montezuma CastleArizona Dec. 8, 1906Cliff-dwellings, prehistoric160.02
17El MoroNew MexicoDec. 8, 1906 Inscribed rocks160.00
18Chaco CanyonNew Mexico Mch. 11, 1907Pueblo ruin, prehistoric20,629.40
19*Lassen PeakCalifornia May 6, 1907Extinct volcano1,280.00
20*Cinder ConeCalifornia May 6, 1907Lava field5,120.00
21*Gila Cliff-DwellingsNew Mexico Nov. 16, 1907Cliff-dwellings, prehistoric 160.00
22*TontoArizonaDec. 19, 1907 Cliff-dwellings, prehistoric640.00
23Muir Woods3California Jan. 9, 1908Primeval redwood forest295.00
24*Grand CanyonArizonaJan. 11, 1908 "Titan of chasms"806,400.00
25*PinnaclesCaliforniaJan. 16, 1908 Rock pinnacles and caves2,080.00
26*Jewel CaveSo. Dakota Feb. 7, 1908Large cavern1280.00
27Natural BridgesUtahApr. 16, 1908 Three natural bridges4120.00
28Lewis and Clark CavernMontana May 11, 1908Limestone cavern160,00
29Tumacacori5Arizona Sept. 5, 1908Spanish mission ruin10.00
30*WheelerColoradoDec. 7, 1908 Volcanic formations300.00
31*Mt. OlympusWashington Mch. 2, (1901)Habitat of Olympic elk6 608,640.00
32NavajoArizonaMch. 20, (1901) Cliff-dwellings and pueblos600.00
33*Oregon CavesOregonJuly 10, (1901) Limestone caverns480.00
     1,510,443.35

*Managed by U. S. Forest Service, Department of Agriculture. These areas lie within National Forests. All others managed by Department of Interior. These were created out of National Forest lands. All others except Muir Woods and Tumacacori were created from unpatented public lands. See notes 3 and 5.
1 Monuments created by Presidential proclamatiion under Act of June 8, 1906, "For the Preservation of American Antiquities." Act specifies "historic landmarks, historic and prehistoric structures, and other objects of historic or scientific interest" as reservable under this authority. No power given to lease any part of such lands. The Secretaries of the Interior, Agriculture, and War are directed to draw uniform rules for the control of these tracts. They may permit "properly qualified institutiions" to carry on scientific investigations, including excavations and collecting. No appropriation ever made for maintenance of monuments. No revenue derived therefrom. A fine up to $500 or imprisonment up to 90 days, or both, is the penalty for unlicensed excavating or collecting, or for injuring the reserved properties.
2 Includes any possible private claims. Extent of patented lands not known to Interior Department.
3 Gift of WIlliam and Elizabeth Thacher Kent of Chicago, Illinois.
4 Proposal to enlarge under consideration.
5 A perfected patent on this land was relinquished by the entryman.
6 The Olympic elk is a rare species and found only in this section of Cascade Mountains.

IV. Location and Area of the National Forests in the United States, Alaska, and Porto Rico, and Dates When Latest Proclamations Became Effective.

June 30, (1901).

[Official Table of the Forest Service, United States Department of Agriculture.]

State or
Territory
ForestHeadquarters of
Supervisor
Proclamation
Effective
Area:
Acres
Total
ArizonaApacheSpringerville Mar. 2, (1901)1,785,711 
 Chiricahua1DouglasJuly 2, 1908 287,520 
 CoconinoFlagstaffJuly 2, 1908 3,689,982 
 CoronadoBensonJuly 2, 1908 966,368 
 CrookStaffordJuly 1, 1908 788,624 
 Dixie2St. George, Utah Feb. 10, (1901)626,800 
 GarcesNogalesJuly 2, 1908 644,395 
 KaibabKanab, UtahJuly 2, 1908 1,080,000 
 PrescotPrescottFeb 1, 1908 1,541,762 
 SitgreavesSnowflakeMar. 2, (1901) 1,470,364 
 TontoRooseveltFeb. 10, (1901) 2,110,354 
 Zuñi3 Mar. 2, (1901) 266,981 
     15,258,861
ArkansasArkansasMenaFeb. 27, (1901) 1,663,300 
 OzarkHarrisonFeb. 25, (1901) 1,526,481 
     3,189,781
CaliforniaAngelesLos Angeles July 1, 19081,350,900 
 CaliforniaWillowsFeb. 25, (1901) 1,114,904 
 ClevelandSan DiegoJan. 26, (1901) 2,236,178 
 Crater4Medford, Oreg. July 1, 190858,614 
 Inyo5BishopJuly 2, 1908 1,458,444 
 KlamathYrekaFeb. 13, (1901) 2,094,467 
 LassenRed BuffMar. 2, (1901) 1,373,043 
 ModocAlturasFeb. 25, (1901) 1,471,817 
 Mono6Gardnerville, Nevada Mar. 2, (1901)813,789 
 MontereySalinasJuly 2, 1908 514,477 
 PlumasQuincyMar. 2, (1901) 1,407,053 
 San LuisSan Luis ObispoJuly 1, 1908 355,990 
 Santa BarbaraSanta BarbaraJuly 1, 1908 2,027,180 
 SequoiaHot Springs, Tulare Co. Mar. 2, (1901)3,079,942 
 ShastaSissonMar. 2, (1901) 1,754,718 
 SierraNorthforkJuly 2, 1908 1,935,680 
 Siskiyou7Grants Pass, Oregon July 1, 190837,814 
 StanislausSonoraJuly 2, 1908 1,117,625 
 Tahoe8Nevada CityMar. 2, (1901) 1,931,042 
 TrinityWeavervilleMar. 2, (1901) 1,834,833 
     27,968,510
ColoradoArapahoSulphur Springs July 1, 1908796,815 
 Battlement9Collbran July 1, 1908759,002 
 CochetopaSaguacheJuly 1, 1908 932,890 
 GunnisonGunnisonJuly 1, 1908 945,350 
 Hayden10Encampment, Wyoming July 1, 190884,000 

1 Total of Chiricahua in Arizona and New Mexico = 466,497 acres.
2 Total of Dixie in Arizona and Utah = 1,102,655 acres.
3 Total of Zuñi in Arizona and New Mexico = 670,981 acres.
4 Total of Crater in California and Oregon = 1,119,834 acres.
5 Total of Inyo in California and Nevada = 1,521,017 acres.
6 Total of Mono in California and Nevada = 1,349,126 acres.
7 Total of Siskiyou in California and Oregon = 1,302,393 acres.
8 Total of Tahoe in California and Nevada = 1,992,127 acres.
9 Area of Battlement revised by General Land Office, May 27, (1901).
10 Total of Hayden in Colorado and Wyoming = 454,911 acres.

State or
Territory
ForestHeadquarters of
Supervisor
Proclamation
Effective
Area:
Acres
Total
ColoradoHolly Cross1Glenwood Springs April. 26, (1901)595,840 
—cont.La Sal2 Moab, UtahMar. 16, (1901)29,502 
 Las Animas3La VetaMar. 1, 1907 196,140 
 LeadvilleLeadvilleJuly 1, 1908 1,184,730 
 Medicine BowFort ColinsJuly 1, 1908 659,780 
 MontezumaMancosJuly 1, 1908 1,175,811 
 PikeDenverJuly 1, 1908 1,457,524 
 Rio GrandeMonte VistaJuly 1, 1908 1,262,158 
 RouttSteamboat SpringsJuly 1, 1908 1,049,686 
 San IsabelWestcliffeJuly 2, 1908 560,848 
 San JuanDurangoJuly 1, 1908 1,460,880 
 Sopris1AspenApril. 26, (1901) 655,360 
 UncompahgreDeltaJuly 1, 1908 921,243 
 White RiverMeekerMay 21, 1904 970,880 
     15,698,439
FloridaChoctawhatchee Nov. 27, 1908 467,606 
 Ocala Nov. 24, 1908207,285  
     674,891
IdahoBeverhead4Dillon, Mont. July 1, 1908304,140 
 BoiseBoiseJuly 1, 1908 1,147,360 
 Cache5Logan, UtahJuly 1, 1908 276,640 
 Caribou6Idaho Falls Jan. 15, 1907733,000 
 ChallisChallisJuly 1, 1908 1,161,040 
 ClearwaterKooskiaJuly 1, 1908 2,687,860 
 Coeur d’AleneWallaceJuly 1, 1908 1,543,844 
 IdahoEloJuly 1, 19081,293,280  
 Kaniksu7Newport, Wash. July 1, 1908544,220 
 LemhiMackayJuly 1, 1908 955,408 
 Minidoka8OakleyJuly 2, 1908 619,204 
 NezperceGrangevilleJuly 1, 1908 1,946,340 
 PayetteEmmettJuly 1, 1908 844,240 
 Pend d’OreilleSandpointJuly 1, 1908 913,364 
 Pocatello9Pocatello July 1, 1908288,148 
 SalmonSalmonJuly 1, 1908 1,762,472 
 SawtoothHaileyJuly 1, 1908 1,211,920 
 Targhee10St. Anthony July 1, 19081,101,720 
 WeiserWeiserJuly 1, 1908 764,829 
     20,099,029
KansasKansasGarden City May 15, 1908302,387 
     302,387
MichiganMarquette Feb. 10, (1901) 30,603 
 Michigan Feb. 11, (1901) 132,770 
     163,373
MinnesotaMinnesota11Cass Lake May 23, 1908294,752 
 SuperiorElyFeb. 13, (1901) 909,734 
     1,204,486
MontanaAbsarokaLivingston July 1, 1908980,440 
 BeartoothRed LodgeJuly 1, 1908 685,293 
 Beaverhead4DillonJuly 1, 1908 1,506,680 

1 Holy Cross divided into Holy Cross and Sopris National Forests, April 26, (1901).
2 Total of La Sal in Colorado and Utah = 474,130 acres.
3 Total of Las Animas in Colorado and New Mexico = 196,620 acres.
4 Total of Beaverhead in Idaho and Montana = 1,810,820 acres.
5 Total of Cache in Idaho and Utah = 533,840 acres.
6 Total of Caribou in Idaho and Wyoming = 740,740 acres.
7 Total of Kaniksu in Idaho and Washington = 950,740 acres.
8 Total of Minidoka in Idaho and Utah = 736,407 acres.
9 Total of Pocatello in Idaho and Utah = 298,868 acres
10 Total of Targhee in Idaho and Wyoming = 1,479,320 acres.
11 Minnesota National Forest created by act of Congress.

State or
Territory
ForestHeadquarters of
Supervisor
Proclamation
Effective
Area:
Acres
Total
MontanaBitterrootMissoula July 1, 19081,180,900 
—cont.BlackfeetKalispellJuly 1, 1908 1,956,340 
 CabinetThompson FallsJuly 1, 1908 1,020,960 
 CusterAshlandJuly 2, 1908 590,720 
 DeerlodgeAnacondaJuly 1, 1908 1,080,220 
 FlatheadKalispellJuly 1, 1908 2,092,785 
 GallatinBozemanJuly 1, 1908 907,160 
 HelenaHelenaJuly 1, 1908 930,180 
 JeffersonGreat FallsJuly 2, 1908 1,255,320 
 KootenaiLibbyJuly 1, 1908 1,661,260 
 Lewis and ClarkChouteauJuly 1, 1908 884,136 
 LoloMissoulaNov. 6, 1906 1,211,680 
 MadisonSheridanJuly 1, 1908 1,102,860 
 MissoulaMissoulaJuly 1, 1908 1,237,509 
 Sioux1Camp Crook, So. Dakota Feb. 15, (1901)145,253 
     20,389,696
NebraskaNebraskaHalseyJuly 2, 1908 566,072 
     566,072
NevadaHumboldtElkoJan. 20, (1901) 1,158,814 
 Inyo2Bishop, Cal.July 2, 1908 62,573 
 MoapaLas VegasJan. 21, (1901) 390,580 
 Mono3GardnervilleMar. 2, (1901) 535,337 
 NevadaElyFeb. 10, (1901) 1,222,312 
 Tahoe4Nevada City, Cal. Mar. 2, (1901)61,085 
 ToiyabeAustinFeb. 20, (1901) 1,678,714 
     5,109,415
NewAlamoAlamogordoMar. 2, (1901) 1,513,817 
MexicoCarsonAntonito, Colo. Mar. 2, (1901)1,390,680 
 Chiricahua5Douglas, Ariz. July 2, 1908178,977 
 DatilMagdalenaFeb. 23, (1901) 2,869,888 
 GilaSilver CityFeb. 15, (1901) 1,782,562 
 JemezSanta FéJuly 1, 1908 944,085 
 Las Animas6La Veta, Colo. Mar. 1, 1907480 
 LincolnCapitanMar. 2, (1901) 677,790 
 ManzanoAlbuquerqueApr. 16, 1908 587,110 
 PecosSanta FéJan. 28, (1901) 622,322 
 Zuñi7 Mar. 2, (1901) 404,000 
     10,971,711
North DakotaDakotaCamp Crook, So. Dakota Nov. 24, 190813,940 
     13,940
OklahomaWhichitaCacheMay 29, 1906 60,800 
     60,800
OregonCascadeEugeneJuly 1, 1908 1,767,370 
 Crater8MedfordJuly 1, 1908 1,061,220 
 DeschutesPrinevilleJuly 14, 1908 1,504,207 
 FremontLakeviewJuly 14, 1908 1,260,320 
 MalheurJohn DayJuly 1, 1908 1,167,400 
 OregonPortlandJuly 1, 1908 1,787,280 
 Siskiyou9Grants Pass July 1, 19081,264,579 
 SiuslawEugeneJuly 1, 1908 821,794 
 UmatillaHeppnerJuly 1, 1908 540,496 
 UmpquaRoseburgJuly 1, 1908 1,567,500 

1 Total of Sioux in Montana and South Dakota = 249,653 acres.
2 Total of Inyo in California and Nevada = 1,521,017 acres.
3 Total of Mono in California and Nevada = 1,349,126 acres.
4 Total of Tahoe in California and Nevada = 1,992,127 acres.
5 Total Chiricahua in Arizona and New Mexico = 466,497 acres.
6 Total of Las Animas in Colorado and New Mexico = 196,620 acres.
7 Total of Zuñi in Arizona and New Mexico = 670,981 acres.
8 Total of Crater in California and Oregon = 1,119,834 acres.
9 Total of Siskiyou in California and Oregon = 1,302,393 acres.

State or
Territory
ForestHeadquarters of
Supervisor
Proclamation
Effective
Area:
Acres
Total
OregonWallowaWallowaJuly 2, 1908 1,750,240 
—cont.Wenaha1Walla Walla, Washington Mar. 1, 1907494,942 
 WhitmanSumpterJuly 1, 1908 1,234,020 
     16,221,368
SouthBlack HillsDeadwood Feb. 15, (1901)1,190,040 
DakotaSioux2Camp Crook Feb. 15, (1901)104,400 
     1,294,440
UtahAshley3Vernal July 1, 1908947,490 
 Cache4LoganJuly 1, 1908 257,200 
 Dixie5St. GeorgeFeb. 10, (1901) 475,865 
 FillmoreBeaverJuly 1, 1908 578,459 
 FishlakeSalinaJuly 2, 1908 537,233 
 La Sal6MoabMar. 16, (1901) 444,628 
 MantiEphraimApr. 25, 1907 786,080 
 Minidoka7Oakley, Idaho July 2, 1908117,203 
 NeboNephiJuly 1, 1908 343,920 
 Pocatello8Pocatello, Idaho July 1, 190810,720 
 PowellEscalanteJuly 2, 1908 726,159 
 SevierPanguitchJan. 17, 1906 710,920 
 UintaProvoJuly 1, 1908 1,250,610 
 WasatchSalt Lake CityJuly 2, 1908 249,840 
     7,436,327
WashingtonChelanChelanJuly 1, 1908 2,492,500 
 ColumbiaPortland, Oreg.July 1, 1908 941,440 
 ColvilleRepublicMar. 1, 1907 869,520 
 Kaniksu9NewportJuly 1, 1908 406,520 
 OlympicOlympiaMar. 2, 1907 1,594,560 
 RainierOrtingJuly 1, 1908 1,641,280 
 SnoqualmieSeattleJuly 1, 1908 961,120 
 WashingtonBellinghamJuly 1, 1908 1,419,040 
 Wenaha1Walla WallaMar. 1, 1907 318,400 
 WenatcheeLeavenworthJuly 1, 1908 1,421,120 
     12,065,500
WyomingAshley3Vernal, Utah July 1, 19084,596 
 BighornSheridanJuly 2, 1908 1,151,680 
 BonnevillePinedaleJuly 1, 1908 1,627,840 
 Caribou10Idaho Falls, Idaho Jan. 15, 19077,740 
 CheyenneLaramieJuly 1, 1908 617,932 
 Hayden11EncampmentJuly 1, 1908 370,911 
 ShoshoneCodyJuly 1, 1908 1,689,680 
 SundanceSundanceJuly 1, 1908 183,224 
 Targhee12St. Anthony, Idaho July 1, 1908377,600 
 TetonJacksonJuly 1, 1908 1,991,200 
 WyomingAftonJuly 1, 1908 976,320 
     8,998,723

Total of 147 National Forests in the United States . . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. 167,677,749

1 Total of Wenaha in Oregon and Washington = 813,342 acres.
2 Total of Sioux in Montana and South Dakota = 249,653 acres.
3 Total of Ashley in Utah and Wyoming = 952,086 acres.
4 Total of Cache in Idaho and Utah = 523,840 acres.
5 Total of Dixie in Arizona and Utah = 1,102,665 acres.
6 Total of La Sal in Colorado and Utah = 474,130 acres.
7 Total of Minidoka in Idaho and Utah = 736,407 acres.
8 Total of Pocatello in Idaho and Utah = 298,868 acres.
9 Total of Kaniksu in Idaho and Washington = 950,740 acres.
10Total of Caribou in Idaho and Wyoming = 740,740 acres.
11 Total of Hayden in Colorado and Wyoming = 454,911 acres.
12 Total of Targhee in Idaho and Wyoming = 1,479,320 acres.

State or
Territory
ForestHeadquarters of
Supervisor
Proclamation
Effective
Area:
Acres
Total
AlaskaChugachKetchikanFeb. 23, (1901) 11,280,640 
 TongassKetchikanFeb. 16, (1901) 15,480,986 
     26,761,626
Porto RicoLuquillo Jan. 17, 1903 65,950 
     65,950

Grand total of 150 National Forests. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. . . .. 194,505,325


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