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A Climber’s Guide to the High Sierra (1954), edited by Hervey H. Voge


Tioga Pass to Mammoth Pass

The Minarets and the Ritter Range

Walter A. Starr* (1938) and Louis A. Elliott (1953)

* Assisted by Jules Eichorn, Glen Dawson, William Rice, Ansel Adams, and the climbing notes of Walter A. Starr, Jr.

THE SIERRA CREST south of Island Pass surrenders its Alpine summits and scenic attractions to the Ritter Range, whose peaks rise two to three thousand feet higher to the west. The Ritter Range is a remnant of an ancient mountain system and, as François Matthes writes, “when you climb Mount Ritter you climb the core of one of the ancestral mountains that were formed more than a hundred million years before the present Sierra Nevada was uplifted” (SCB, 1930, 1-8).

Geologically the Ritter Range is composed of dark mottled rocks representing ancient lavas, highly metamorphosed, associated with a complex of dark igneous rocks. This tough rock has resisted the forces of erosion through the ages, which accounts for the height of the range. The joint planes generally are vertical, or at high angles, with northwesterly trends. This structure causes the almost vertical faces and knife-edge ridges which are characteristic of the range. Caution is called for in climbing because of the danger of loose blocks or slabs which may pull away from the faces.

The chutes in the Minarets, as in other parts of the Sierra, constitute convenient routes of approach. But the systems of chutes in the Minarets are often complex, and many chutes carry difficult chockstones. One must watch with care to select the right chute, and should carry a rappel rope for the descent. The rocks are on the whole quite sound, but handholds, which are usually plentiful and of adequate size, need to be tested carefully. Many of the ledges slope downwards, and exposure is often considerable. There are a great many possible routes up almost any of the Minarets when combinations of chutes, ridges, and ledges are considered. The rocks are very hard and many have sharp edges that approximate right angles and will cut hands or ropes unless care is taken. It is difficult to round the edges of some of these rocks with a hammer, and hence padding is sometimes desirable for a rappel point.

The John Muir Trail passes east of the range close to its base. Here lie several lakes, famed for their beauty—Thousand Island, Garnet, Ediza, Shadow, Upper and Lower Iceberg, and Minaret. The nearest approaches by road are Silver Lake, Agnew Meadow, and Devil’s Postpile. Good campsites will be found above the western end of Lake Ediza (9,400) and on the meadows of Shadow Creek above Shadow Lake (9,000). More exposed campsites may be found at Garnet Lake (9,700), and Thousand Island Lake (9,850). There are good campsites on upper Minaret Creek (9,000-9,500), and between Lake Ediza and Lower Iceberg, from which to approach the southern end of the Minarets. For detailed information concerning approaches and trails see Starr’s Guide to the John Muir Trail and the High Sierra Region.

Mount Davis is the most northerly peak of the range and Iron Mountain the most southerly. Sketch 7 presents a map of the region. Although peaks of this range have been climbed for many years, no pinnacle of the Minarets was climbed until 1922. Since 1931, by application of sound rock-climbing methods, the difficulty and danger have been greatly lessened, and most of these pinnacles have been ascended. This region offers some of the finest climbing in the Sierra Nevada, and it is also endowed with unusual grandeur, beauty, and fascination.

Banner and Ritter are twin peaks, connected by a saddle. To the east a cliff drops off from the saddle. Sloping northwestward from the saddle, North Glacier covers the floor of the chasm between the two peaks, flowing down to North Glacier Lake. Half a mile south of this lake and lapping the western base of Ritter lies Ritter Lake. Beyond and somewhat above, another lakelet is fed by Southwest Glacier which fills a rugged amphitheater on the north side of a bold jagged spur extending southwesterly from the summit of Ritter. The highest point on this arête might be regarded as the western summit of Ritter. On the southeast side of Ritter, draining into Lake Ediza, Southeast Glacier slopes steeply down, enclosed in an amphitheater bounded on the north by the face of the peak and on the south by pinnacles extending downward from the crest of a spur which dips southeastward from the summit to a saddle. South of this saddle the knife-edge ridges of the Minarets, crowned with many pinnacles, split the sky. At its southern end the ridge forks into two groups of minarets, the eastern dominated by Clyde Minaret and the western by Michael Minaret, the two highest pinnacles. Between them a remarkable amphitheater is formed by their sheer walls, in which lies a small ice lake. Several small, steep glaciers lie along the sloping walls of the eastern base of the Minarets.

An ice axe is necessary and crampons may be helpful for ascents over the glaciers east of mounts Banner and Ritter and of the Minarets.

Sketch 7. The Ritter Range and the Minarets.
[click to enlarge]
Sketch 7. The Ritter Range and the Minarets.
Note: The new Muir Trail goes east of Garnet Lake.
1Clyde Minaret6Dawson Minaret11Volcanic PeaksDKen Minaret
2Michael Minaret7Leonard MinaretARiegelhuth
Minaret
EJensen Minaret
3Eichorn Minaret8Waller Minaret
4Rice Minaret9Adams MinaretCKehrlein
Minaret
5Bedayan Minaret10Starr Minaret

Principal Passes

The Ritter Range may be approached from the North Fork of the San Joaquin River on its western side, but by far the nearest and most interesting approaches are from the trails leading to its eastern side. To cross the range several passes are available.

Glacier Lake Pass, east to west. Class 1. From the head of Thousand Island Lake ascend to the saddle between Banner Peak and Mount Davis, keeping to the side of the basin toward Davis. North Glacier Lake lies on the saddle. Easy rocky slopes are met on the west side.

Banner-Ritter Saddle, east to west (11,600+n). Class 3; ice axe needed. From Lake Ediza, or Garnet Lake, ascend to the basin lying east of the cliff between Banner and Ritter. Climb the cliff to the saddle, keeping to the right of black stains made by water courses near the middle of the cliff, and following a series of zigzag ledges. From the saddle descend on the north side of the glacier to the east end of North Glacier Lake.

Ritter Pass, east to west. Class 1. From Lake Ediza ascend the cliff southwest of the lake to the saddle between Ritter and Waller Minaret. Easy, rocky slopes lie on the west side.

The Gap, east to west. Class 2; ice axe usually needed. From Lake Edina climb the cliff or chimneys below the gap south of Waller Minaret, and ascend the small glacier to the gap. Steep talus slopes are on the west side.

North Notch, east to west. Class 3; ice axe useful (seasonal). From Lake Ediza ascend southwest up the stream which enters the head of the lake to an easy ridge leading toward the notch (lowest point) between Jensen and Dawson minarets. There is a nice ledge leading up from the north into the chute. Climb the chute past one small chock-stone to the notch. This is the shortest route to the west side of the highest minarets from Lake Ediza. Rough steep talus slopes extend along the west base of the Minarets.

South Notch, east to west. Class 2 to 3 (seasonal); ice axe needed. To approach from Minaret Lake, ascend the stream entering the lake to a bench above the southwest end of Upper Iceberg Lake. To approach from Lake Ediza, ascend the stream on the south side of the lake to Lower Iceberg Lake. Traverse on the east side and climb up to Upper Iceberg Lake. Traverse on the west side of this to a bench above the southwest end.

From the southwest end of Upper Iceberg Lake ascend the steep slope (snow conditions seasonal) to the col or notch between C Minaret and D Minaret, which rise just south of Clyde Minaret. A prominent pinnacle stands above the north side of the notch. Traverse west from the notch into Minaret Amphitheater which contains a small ice lake. Ascend to the col on the southeast side of Michael Minaret and descend a chute (class 4) to the base (western side) of that minaret. To reach this point by the long route (class 1) from the amphitheater, circle Adams Minaret to the south and west and then cross a spur ridge to the north, keeping well to the west to avoid difficult chutes on the north side of the spur.

Beck Lakes Pass, south to north. Class 1. From the northwest side of Upper Beck Lake ascend northwest up talus, rocks, and snowslopes to a saddle. Cross the basin at the head of Iron Creek and cross a spur ridge extending southwest from Adams Minaret at a low point to the head of Dike Creek. Or, ascend to the upper end of Iron Creek into Minaret Amphitheater and proceed as from the South Notch. There is a trail from Devil’s Postpile to Lower Beck Lake.

Routes on the Peaks (North to South)

Mount Davis (12,308; 12,311n)

First Ascent August 28, 1891, by Milton F. Davis.

Route 1. Southeast slope. Class 1. From Thousand Island Lake proceed to the low pass between Davis and Banner (Glacier Lake Pass) and climb up toward the summit, staying on the southwest side of the sharp ridge. The slope to be traversed is quite gentle and leads up to the easy southeast slopes of the peak. This route may also be reached by traversing southwest from Island Pass and passing through a notch in the ridge southeast of the summit. On this variation some care is necessary in route finding across the high shoulder above Thousand Island Lake.

Route 2. Northeast buttress. Class 4. Ascended by Hervey Voge and Virginia Romain, August 20, 1950. The northeast buttress rises above a slope of snow or ice somewhat east of the main north buttress. Ascend the east side of the northeast buttress, climb an open chute to the ridge of the buttress, follow this to the broad slopes southeast of the summit, and walk up these to the top.

Route 3. North buttress. Class 4. Ascended by Jim Koontz and companion, August 20, 1950. Climb up between the main north buttress and the glacier to the west, and when the rocks become easier go up the rocks to the top of the buttress which is followed almost directly to the summit.

Banner Peak (12,957; 12,945n)

Route 1. North glacier and southwest slope. Class 2. First ascent, August 26, 1883, by Willard D. Johnson and John Miller (SCB, 1905, 193). From Thousand Island Lake, ascend to the east end of North Glacier Lake (see Glacier Lake Pass), climb the rocks to the north edge of the glacier lying between Banner and Ritter, and ascend the glacier on that side to the saddle at its head, just short of the east cliff. Thence ascend steep talus slopes and easy rocks to the summit.

Route 2. East cliff and southwest slope. Class 3. From Lake Ediza, or Garnet Lake, climb to the saddle between Banner and Ritter, thence to summit as on Route 1 (see Banner-Ritter Saddle).

Route 3. East face. Class 4. First ascent August 3, 1931, by Jules M. Eichorn and Robert L. M. Underhill (SCB, 1932, 114-115). From Garnet Lake start up the chimney to the left of the buttress to the south of Banner Glacier. Leave the chimney and take to the ridge north of the chimney leading up from the buttress. Climb the ridge until an overhang makes the ridge look impossible. Traverse diagonally right upward about 80 feet along a rather smooth wall, and then climb broad steep chutes or faces to the summit.

Route 4. Southeast face. Class 5. Ascent July 6, 1946, by Charles Wilts and Harry Sutherland, who went about up the middle of the southeast face as viewed from near Lake Ediza, and described the climb as the finest in two trips to the Minarets. They started in the first couloir right of a deep chimney, ascended to a point where it was necessary to cross left into another couloir rising from the chimney, and then continued diagonally right and up a nearly vertical face to a balcony which usually has a small snowfield. Then after traversing right about 100 yards, they went straight up to reach the top about 100 yards left of the summit.

Mount Ritter (13,156; 13,157n)

Route 1. North glacier and north face. Class 3. First ascent October 1872 by John Muir (The Mountains of California, 1894, 52-73). From Thousand Island Lake proceed as on Route 1 for Banner Peak to the saddle between Banner and Ritter. Ascend the snowfield to the right hand or west chute of two chutes leading up the north wall of Ritter. From the top of the chute cross a ridge to the left into the head of the left hand chute to a wide ledge leading diagonally left to the arête. Thence follow the arête west to summit.

Route 2. East cliff and north face. Class 3. From Lake Ediza or Garnet Lake proceed as on Route 2 for Banner Peak, to the saddle between Banner and Ritter, and thence to the top as in Route 1.

Route 3. Glacier Lake pass. Ritter Lake. West slope. Class 2. First ascent August 20, 1892, by Theodore S. Solomons (SCB, 1894, 69-70). From Thousand Island Lake proceed to North Glacier Lake (see Glacier Lake Pass). Thence proceed around the west side of the mountain to Ritter Lake. Climb the west slope (various routes) to the summit.

Route 4. Southeast glacier, south side. Class 3; ice axe useful. First ascent, June 28, 1928, by Norman Clyde (SCB, 1929, 87). From Lake Ediza proceed to the base of the cliffs slightly to the left (S) of the lower end of the glacier. Climb the cliff to the left of the lowest of the pinnacles on the south side of the glacier. Pass through a gap above the lowest pinnacle onto the glacier, Continue up on the south side of the glacier, keeping left of an ice ridge which extends from the lower to the upper part of the glacier, until a crevasse renders further travel upward on the glacier impossible. Leave the south side of the glacier, climb over the ice ridge and descend across the glacier (use ice axe for safety) to its extreme northwest edge, whence ascend easy rocks and talus slope to the summit.

Route 5. Southeast glacier, north side. Class 2 to 3 (seasonal); ice axe may be needed when snow is high on the north side of the glacier. Evidently this was John Muir’s route of descent in October 1872. It is the easiest route from Lake Ediza. First known ascent August 3, 1931, by Sierra Club party led by Lewis Clark and Ernest Dawson (SCB, 1932, 115). From Lake Ediza proceed to the snout of the glacier and below it to its north side, and thence up talus at the base of the south cliff of Ritter along the north side of the glacier to a chute which leads up (N) to the talus slope extending northwest to the summit.

Route 6. Northeast buttress. Class 3 to 4. Ascent August 7, 1941, by Art Argiewicz and Lorin Trubschenk. This buttress rises 2,000 feet from the cirque enclosed by Banner and Ritter to the summit ridge, and is east of the prominent snow ledge on the north face as viewed from Garnet Lake. Proceed directly up the buttress on firm angular rock and over debris-covered ledges.

Winter Ascent. An ascent was made in February 1952 by George Bloom, Bob Swift, and Floyd Burnette (SCB, 1953, 40), who used 1 Route 3.

Pinnacles (highest pinnacle, 12,300). Class 3. First ascent of highest pinnacle August 4, 1936, by Richard M. Jones and William Rice. From Lake Ediza proceed as on Route 4 for Ritter to the lowest pinnacle. After crossing through the gap above, contour west a short distance and climb the highest pinnacle by one of several possible routes.

Ritter, southwest spur. There have been no recorded ascents of the several summits on the arête.

The Minarets

These are listed from north to south, and the identifying numerals or letters correspond to those on the accompanying Sketches 7, 8, and 9.

Sketch 8. The Minarets from Minaret Creek.
[click to enlarge]
Sketch 8. The Minarets from Minaret Creek.
1Clyde Minaret6Dawson Minaret11Volcanic PeaksDKen Minaret
2Michael Minaret7Leonard MinaretARiegelhuth
Minaret
EJensen Minaret
3Eichorn Minaret8Waller Minaret
4Rice Minaret9Adams MinaretCKehrlein
Minaret
5Bedayan Minaret10Starr Minaret

The Minarets have been named after the climbers who made the first ascents, with one or two exceptions.

No. 8. Waller Minaret (11,711n)

Class 4-5. First ascent August 1934 by Ted Waller and Jules M. Eichorn. This minaret is the summit of the ridge between the Gap and Ritter Pass. From the crest of the Gap follow the south end of the Waller ridge down and east for approximately 150 feet where a ledge will be found running east and then around a buttress and northerly on the east face. Rope up and follow this ledge. About one pitch along the ledge, work diagonally up the east face, aiming to reach the arête just above the vertical wall rising from the Gap. One or two pitons may be needed for protection in this section. Walk north up the chute dividing the arête for about 150 feet, until stopped by the high angle, smooth south face of a large tower or step. This 180-foot face may be climbed directly by following a series of cracks and small footholds up the center. Pitons will probably be desired on this high angle, airy

Sketch 9. East Face of the Minarets from Shadow Creek.
[click to enlarge]
Sketch 9. East Face of the Minarets from Shadow Creek.
1 Clyde Minaret5 Bedayan Minaret8 Waller Minaret
3 Eichorn Minaret6 Dawson MinaretE Jensen Minaret
4 Rice Minaret7 Leonard Minaret11 Volcanic Peaks
series of pitches. Scramble north along this step, crossing over to the west side. Descend 20 feet, traverse around top of steep couloir and around a rib on west face. From here go diagonally right directly toward summit via one more step on ridge. Descent may be effected by the same route providing a 300-foot rappel rope is available. An ascent from the north and east may be easier.

No. 7. Leonard Minaret (11,600+n)

Route 1. Southeast rock chimney. Class 4. First ascent August 4, 1932, by Richard M. Leonard and H. B. Blanks. From Lake Ediza proceed on the route toward North Notch. From the benches above (W) of Lower Iceberg Lake, Leonard Minaret will be seen on the right as a sharp spire, being the abrupt termination of a narrow arête projecting east at right angles to the main crest. A prominent (and sometimes snow-filled) chimney will be noted on the right center of the terminus of the arête. The best route on this face is up a less prominent rock chimney left (S) of the snow chimney, to a conspicuous ledge on the northeast face of the arête at the head of the snow chimney. Climb this face diagonally to the left (SE) to the crest, thence along the arête east to the cairn and register above the terminus.

Route 2. Traverse west to east. Class 4. First ascent August 19, 1933, by Norman Clyde. From the Gap climb up the ridge of the minaret, and traverse the arête east to the cairn and register at the east end.

Point F. Turner Minaret (11,600+n)

A party of three led by Ed Turner made a first ascent of the Minaret north of Point “E” on July 14, 1938.

Point E. Jensen Minaret (11,760+n)

First ascent by Carl P. Jensen and Howard Gates June 1937. A new route was used in climbing Jensen Minaret by Spencer Austin, Dan Bannerman, and Charles Wilts July 27, 1943. From the Shadow Creek Basin, two prominent cracks or chimneys can be seen immediately to the right of the Minaret. The right-hand chimney was ascended to a sharp saddle on the main ridge. The arête was then followed to the left to the summit. Minumum class 5 (1 or 2 pitons).

No. 6. Dawson Minaret (11,920+n)

Class 4. First ascent August 16, 1933, by Glen Dawson, Jules Eichorn, and Richard M. Jones (SCE, 1934, 83, 99). From North Notch work along the west side of the first little minaret to the south, and traverse around it into the next chute. Then climb directly toward the summit up a broken face, work to the right to a prominent shelf on the ridge, and cross the head of the next chute to the final south face, where an open chimney leads to the summit. The final south face can also be reached from the west via the chute that heads just under this face, a chockstone being bypassed by a ridge to the left.

No. 5. Bedayan Minaret (12,080+n)

Class 3. First ascent August 11, 1936, by Torcom Bedayan and William Rice. Traverse from Rice Minaret to the next minaret north. Another route was made August 25, 1950, by Hervey Voge and L. Bruce Meyer. From the west climb the chute that heads north of Bedayan Minaret, entering the chute by a ledge at the right (S) base, and about 100 yards from the top cross over to the next chute south and climb the south face.

No. 4. Rice Minaret (12,080+n)

Class 4. First ascent August 1936, by William Rice and Torcom Bedayan. Ascend Starr’s Chute, as on the start of Route 3 for Michael Minaret, and climb the minaret north of the head of this chute. An ascent from the chute to the northwest was made August 25, 1950, by Hervey Voge and L. Bruce Meyer, who crossed over from the chute southwest of Dawson Minaret.

No. 3. Eichorn Minaret (12,160+n)

Class 3. First ascent July 31, 1931, by Jules Eichorn, Glen Dawson, and Walter Brem (SCB, 1932, 114). This minaret is at the junction where the minaret ridge divides into east and west spurs. The east spur goes to Clyde Minaret, while the other turns south to Michael Minaret. Eichorn Minaret may therefore be reached by traverses along the arête from either Clyde or Michael minarets, or may be climbed directly up either Eichorn’s Chute or Starr’s Chute (see Michael Minaret).

No. 1. Clyde Minaret (12,278; 12,281n)

Route 1. Glacier. Class 4; ice axe needed. First ascent June 27, 1928, by Norman Clyde. From Minaret Lake or Lake Ediza proceed to the northwest end of Upper Iceberg Lake and climb around the base of the minaret to the glacier. Ascend the glacier to near its head, and cross over to rocks (seasonal difficulty of bergschrund must be considered). Climb rocks diagonally left across a series of broad chutes and slight ridges to just below the summit, thence up a chimney to the summit arête. The summit is then about 30 yards to the left along the toothed arête. Variations are possible.

Route 2. Rock route. Easy class 4. First ascent July 26, 1929, by Glen Dawson, John Nixon, and William A. Horsfall (SCB, 1930, 109-110). A variation of Route 1 and a preferable route. From the northwest end of Upper Iceberg Lake traverse to the first chute south of the glacier. This chute may be entered by a ledge from the lower part of the glacier, or via a chimney directly under the chute, or, better, by an easy ledge that starts about 100 yards southeast of the chimney. Ascend the chute to near its head and climb diagonally left to the summit as on Route 1.

Route 3. East face. Class 4. First ascent, August 8, 1932, by Walter A. Starr, Jr. From the southwest end of Upper Iceberg Lake, turn into the amphitheater below the minaret. On the right side of the cirque are three high points. Work up a ledge in red rock into a narrow chute. The chute comes out on a ledge running across the east face of the minaret. Proceed up along the ledge to a second chimney and climb the chimney until progress becomes impossible. Diagonal to the right up ledges, ridges, and chimneys to the arête north of the summit, and thence to the top.

No. 2. Michael Minaret (12,240+n)

Route 1. Michael’s Chute. Class 4. First ascent September 6, 1923, by Charles W. Michael (SCB, 1924, 28-33). From Lake Ediza or Minaret Lake proceed via North or South Notch to the west base of Michael Minaret. Climb the deep, narrow chute leading to the skyline directly north of the main pinnacle. From 200 to 300 feet up the chute, large stones are encountered. A third wedged boulder can be surmounted by a series of projections starting about 30 feet below the boulder. These projections bring one to a ledge leading back into the chute above the boulder. A less difficult route is by a shoulder stand over the “ladder with the lower rungs missing” nearer the huge boulder. Continue up the chute to the Portal at its top between Michael Minaret and two large spires. From the Portal follow a ledge going east on the minaret away from the chute and then work back up steep, difficult, exposed rocks to the summit,, It is also possible but very difficult to work directly up from the Portal to the summit.

Route 2. Eichorn’s Chute. Class 4. First ascent August r6, 1933, by Glen Dawson, Jules Eichorn, and Richard M. Jones (SCB, 1934, 83). Go up the first chute north of Michael’s Chute, meeting Route 3 near the top of the chute.

Route 3. Starr’s Chute. Class 4. First ascent August 3, 1933, by Walter A. Starr, Jr. (SCB, 1934, 83). Go up the second chute north of Michael’s Chute to a point about 300 feet below the main crest. There cross to the right into a branch chute leading up the south side of Eichorn Minaret. When near the head of this chute cross right into the head of Eichorn’s Chute, thence cross a ridge of rock into Michael’s Chute, just below the two spires. Thence follow Route 1 to the summit. This seems to be the best mountaineering route to the Portal.

Route 4. Clyde’s Ledge. Class 4. First ascent August 25, 1933, by Norman Clyde (SCB, 1934, 84). From the southwest base of Michael’s Minaret ascend the cliff to a ledge which leads around into Michael’s Chute at a point just above the 40-foot drop over the big chockstone. Continue up as on Route T.

No. 9. Adams Minaret (12,000+n)

Class 3. First ascent July 15, 1937, by Ansel Adams and Rondal Partridge. From the col on the southeast side of Michael Minaret above the Minaret Amphitheater (which may be reached via South Notch; see Passes), climb cliffs south of col to a small peak. Thence proceed southeast along the crest to the summit of the minaret.

Point D. Ken Minaret (11,760+n)

Class 3. First ascent by W. Kenneth Davis and Kenneth D. Adam, September 5, 1938, via northeast face. Descent via west face was class 2.

Point C. Kehrlein Minaret (11,440+n)

On July 13, 1938, Oliver Kehrlein, Dick Cahill, Jim Harkins, and Fred Holmes climbed Point “C” which, although first ascended August 23, 1933, by Norman Clyde, is named after Kehrlein to avoid duplication.

No. 10. Starr Minaret (11,520+n)

Class 2. First ascent, July 14, 1937, by W. A. Starr, Ansel Adams, and Rondal Partridge. From South Notch traverse south to the northwest base of the minaret and climb a rocky slope to the summit.

Point B (10,960+n)

Class 2 from the east. Ascended July 4, 1938, by May Pridham and Mary Van Velsen.

Point A. Riegelhuth Minaret (10,560+n)

Point A was ascended for the first time July 13, 1938, by Jack Riegelhuth, Charlotte Mauk, Josephine Allen, and Bill Leovy. Class 4 by the west face from the divide between A and B.

Volcanic Ridge (11,400+; 11,501n)

West Peak. Class 2. First recorded ascent August 13, 1933, by Craig Barbash and Howard Gates. From the northwest end of Minaret Lake ascend to the saddle north of the lake and climb rocks to the summit west of the saddle. Or, from Lake Ediza, climb the shoulder of Volcanic Ridge just east of the lower end of the stream flowing down from Iceberg Lakes and traverse the north ridge to the summit. There is a sweeping panorama of the Ritter Range from here.

Peak 11,115 (11,110n; 2 W of Minarets)

An apparent first ascent of this peak was made July 13, 1938, by Oliver Kehrlein, John Cahill, Jim Harkins, Fred Holmes, Frank Aitken, and Edwin Koskinen.

Iron Mountain (11,157; 11,149n)

Route 1. South slope. Class 1. From the Devil’s Postpile trail, just west of Cargyle Meadow, an old trail works north up the south slope to a point just west of the summit.

Route 2. East face. Class 2; ice axe useful. From Ashley Lake, which lies at the east base of the peak, ascend directly up the long snow tongue from the head of the lake, or by way of the spur on the south side of the lake, to the crest. Traverse the ridge north to the summit. A trail leads to Ashley Lake from Devil’s Postpile.

References

Text: SCB, 1894, 66-70; 1905, 186-193; 1908, 290-306; 1922, 248; 1924, 28-33; 1930, 2-8, 17-18; 1934, 81-85; 1953, 40. See also LeConte’s “An Ascent of Mt. Ritter,” Appalachia, February 1893, 1-8, and Solomon’ “Unexplored Regions of the High Sierra,” Overland Monthly, May 1896.

Photographs: SCB, 1908, pls. 67, 69, 70; 1919, pl. 238; 1924, Pls. 13, 14; 1930, 1, 31, 34, 39, 47, 50, 58, 75; 1932, 27; 1938, 30-31; 1939, 30; 1049, 15; 1951, 28-29; 1953, 36-37.



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