Home A - Z FAQ Art Prints Online Library Discussion Forum Muir Weather Maps About Search
Online Library: Title Author California Geology History Indians Muir Mountaineering Nature Management

Next: PhotographsContentsPrevious: William Shand, Jr.

A Climber’s Guide to the High Sierra (1954), edited by Hervey H. Voge


Preface

THIS VOLUME represents the culmination of an effort begun in 1933 when the Sierra Club Committee on Mountain Records started the collection of information on the ascents that had been made in the High Sierra. The project was soon enlarged with the ultimate aim of publishing a guidebook to Sierra climbs. Eight separate regions were described in a series of articles published in the Sierra Club Bulletin over the period 1937 to 1951, and these have now been corrected and combined with new material to make this volume. It is to be noted, however, that the project cannot be considered complete or final because many omissions have undoubtedly been made and there is certain to be additional material in the future as new generations of climbers seek out novel routes and unclimbed pinnacles. Therefore the compilers of this guide, now constituting the Sierra Club Mountaineering Committee, will welcome any additions or corrections. For omissions committed because of ignorance we can only offer our sincerest apologies, and shall gently suggest that in the future these climbs can be recorded if we are informed of them.

Mr. and Mrs. William Shand of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, have particularly aided this project through the William Shand Fund contributed in memory of their son, William Shand, Jr., who lost his life in an automobile accident en route to the Tetons in 1946. His parents’ generosity has made possible the publication of the Climber’s Guide in the present form.

Many members of the Sierra Club have contributed to the material in his guide. The patience and ingenuity of the authors of the various sections in correlating heterogeneous bits of information have been invaluable. Others who deserve special mention are: Arthur H. Blake, chairman of the Committee on Mountain Records during the period when many sections of the Guide were compiled; David R. Brower, who throughout has contributed leadership and advice; Norman Clyde, who supplied much material in the region from Mammoth Pass to Kearsarge Pass from his personal notes; Richard M. Leonard, who in 1937 compiled the “Mountain Records of the Sierra Nevada,” which listed all peaks and all known ascents (up to the first five); Gene Hammel and Allen P. Steck, who for successive periods organized and directed work on the Guide; and Walter Starr, who had the “Mountain Records of the Sierra Nevada” and the climbing notes of Walter Starr, Jr., mimeographed for distribution to those who were active in climbing and might make further contributions.

Still others who have helped in various ways are: Kenneth Adam, Ansel Adams, Marjorie Borland, Chispa Chamberlain, Jack Davis, Glen Dawson, Betty De Coe, Marjorie Dunmire, Jules Eichorn, Joan Firey, Samuel W. French, Morgan Harris, Mary Houston, Elizabeth Klevesahl, Jim Koontz, Oscar Krupp, Norvill LaVene, R. G. Meisenheimer, L. Bruce Meyer, Howard Parker, Fernando Penalosa, Bill and Ellen Phillips, A. J. Reyman, William Rice, Ed Roper, Ned Robinson, Ruth Shapero, Jack Sturgeon, Denese Summitt, Chester Versteeg, Suzie Voge, Dale Webster, Laurie Williams, and Owen Williams. Among these A. J. Reyman and Chester Versteeg have been particularly active in climbing peaks for which no information was available and particularly helpful in sending in records from summit registers. The contributions of all are gratefully acknowledged.

Since it is hoped that revised editions of the Guide will be published in the future, climbers are asked to send in additions and corrections. These should be addressed to the Mountaineering Committee, Sierra Club, 1050 Mills Tower, 220 Bush Street, San Francisco 4, California.

Especially desired are records of first ascents and of new routes, either based on personal experience or copied from summit registers. We urge all climbers to carry pencils and notebooks so that details regarding routes and landmarks can be entered on the spot. For new routes, starting points, general orientation of route (compass direction from the summit), and a reasonable amount of detail are desirable. This will make identification of routes much more certain than it is in many of the descriptions in this guide.

There are still many minor peaks of the Sierra for which no records are available. For the most part these peaks have not even been listed here. Those who harbor a desire to tread rocks which have never before felt the presence of man may wish to seek out such peaks. Others will find the same satisfaction of pioneering in making new and perhaps more difficult routes on nonvirgin peaks.

H. V.



Next: PhotographsContentsPrevious: William Shand, Jr.

Home A - Z FAQ Art Prints Online Library Discussion Forum Muir Weather Maps About Search
Online Library: Title Author California Geology History Indians Muir Mountaineering Nature Management

http://www.yosemite.ca.us/library/climbers_guide/preface.html