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Miwok Material Culture: Indian Life of the Yosemite Region (1933) by S. A. Barrett and E. W. Gifford


BASKETRY

Miwok basketry employs several varieties of the two general techniques of twining and coiling. The terms recorded for basketry in general are pūlū'tcī (P); pūla'ka (N); pūla'kka, pūlī'ssa, and allū'mma (C, S). The term mū'ta (C) is applied to white pliable elements used in both coiled and twined basketry, obtained from the young shoots of maple, hazel, willow, pine, oak, redbud, deer brush, and squaw bush.

Miwok basketry in general is characterized by the very extensive use of willow, Salix (tcō'pa, P, N; so'so, N; lī'ma, C), for the warp and woof of twined baskets, and for the foundation of coiled baskets. For the wrapping of the latter, redbud, Cercis occidentalis (lüli, N; tapátapu, C; tapátapa, S) is the preferred material. Southern and Central Miwok basketry shows the influence of the adjacent Yokuts and Shoshonean cultures. This is most apparent in the use of the multiple-grass foundation and the number of typically Shoshonean forms and designs. Plains and Northern basketry is very similar to north-central Californian basketry.



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