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Miwok Material Culture: Indian Life of the Yosemite Region (1933) by S. A. Barrett and E. W. Gifford


MATS

The people of the lowlands made mats (he'sī, P) from at least two species of tule, that circular in cross-section, and that triangular in cross-section. Some were seven feet long by three or four feet wide. They were employed principally as sleeping mats, but were spread as a floor covering during the day and served as a table on which to spread a repast. A mat of a very fine grass (pa'ka, P, N), which grows about springs, was used especially as a “table cloth.” This mat was called uta'pan (P) and ūtap'nu (N). The Northern Miwok made a mat of very fine twigs. The Central Miwok made a mat for the dice game tcata'tu from a grass (sulupu, C) which grows in wet places.



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