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Yosemite: Its Wonders and Its Beauties (1868) by John S. Hittell

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TEN DAYS’ PROGRAMME.

A party prepared to camp out, with ten days time, might make the following programme:

The first night would be spent in camp at the Bridal Veil Meadow, and the first day in seeing that fall, and in riding about the valley on the south side to the Sentinel Rock, at the foot of which would be the camp.

The second day would be given to the ascent of that rock, a difficult task, but possible.

On the third day, the base and summit of the Lower, and the base of the Upper Yosemite Fall would be visited.

On the fourth, the party would go to the top of the Upper Yosemite Fall, ascending, if the water is high, through Indian Cañon, a mile east of the fall, and if the water is low, passing under the Upper Fall at its base, and going up a cañon to the west. On the summit, an extensive view is obtained. The marks of the glaciers a few hundred yards above the fall, are worth looking at.

On the fifth day, Mirror lake and the adjacent scenery would deserve our attention; and we might find time to visit the orchard of Mr. Lamon and give fifty cents each for the privilege of picking the strawberries, raspberries, peaches, or such other berries or fruits as may be in season, as many as we can eat.

The sixth day should be devoted to Toloolewack Cañon, and upon reaching the point for dismounting, the horses should be sent, in charge of a guide, by way of Inspiration Point, round to the head of the Nevada Fall.

The seventh day would be occupied with the Vernal Fall and the cañon below it, and our camp would be Kahchoomah Falls.

The eight day would be given to the Nevada Fall and its vicinity.

On the ninth morning the party would mount at the summit of Nevada Fall, go to Glacial Rock, and look down upon the valley, and then ride up to the summit of the Sentinel Dome, and camp there to get the benefit of the sunset and sunrise. The camp should be on the west side, so as to have a little shelter against the wind which usually blows from the east at night, and is quite cold on the high peaks.

Parties having more than ten days time might go eastward from the Nevada Fall on the Mono trail. In forty miles they would reach the summit of the mountains, and ten miles beyond is Mono Lake. This, however, would not yield so much pleasure as a trip to the summit of Mt. Hoffmann, which is four miles from Porcupine Flat on the Mono Trail. The view from the mountain-top is very extensive, and it is the best to be obtained within three days, the time taken in going from the valley and returning to it.

There is, however, abundant occupation in the valley for those who do not like the toil of climbing the mountains. There are scores of beautiful ravines and nooks which present an endless variety of views. With pleasant company a month can be well spent without going ten miles from the Yosemite Fall.

X. View on the Merced River, looking up the Valley from the base of the Three Brothers.
X. View on the Merced River, looking up the Valley from the base of
the Three Brothers.

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