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Yosemite: Its Wonders and Its Beauties (1868) by John S. Hittell

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TOLOOLEWACK FALL.

Three-quarters of a mile below the Vernal Fall, Toloolweack Creek enters the Merced from the south, and a mile from its mouth it enters the valley by a fall, the hight of which is variously reported from two hundred and fifty to seven hundred and fifty feet, the former figure being probably nearer the truth than the latter. The creek does not fall at the head of the cañon but at one side; and the tourist who goes past the fall finds, when he is nearly on a level with its top, a cavern two hundred and fifty feet high, one hundred feet wide across the month, and one hundred and fifty feet deep horizontally. In Toloolewack Cañon there are many cavern-like places among the piles of immense rocks. The picture of the fall was taken near by.

XIX. Toloolweack Fall, in the South Canon of the Merced, 300 feet high.
XIX. Toloolweack Fall, in the South Canon of the Merced, 300 feet high.

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