Home A - Z FAQ Art Prints Online Library Discussion Forum Muir Weather Maps About Search
Online Library: Title Author California Geology History Indians Muir Mountaineering Nature Management

Next: III. Elizabeth LakeContentsPrevious: I. Lembert Dome

Guide to Tuolumne Meadows Trails (1960) by Allan Shields


II. DOG LAKE

(1-easy half day, 800 ft., 3 miles).

This large lake is surrounded by forest. From its outlet and south side one can see Mt. Dana. On the trail up the ridge before the lake, by looking back at appropriate spots one finds unusual views of the Cathedral range — Cathedral Peak, Fairview Dome, and the Bishop’s Backbone. On warm days, a swim will be welcome refreshment after the climb. You may want to fish, for this lake, like most in the region, is planted. Dog Lake contains brook trout (5, p. 11).

Directions: Walk across the Tuolumne River Bridge. By stopping in the center and looking upstream you may see the confluence of the Lyell Fork and Dana Fork of the river. You will be looking up Lyell Fork, primarily. Cross the bridge and continue to first road on left. Almost immediately you will see a dirt road blocked by a chain between log posts. Behind is a sign reading “Driving Across Meadows Prohibited.” Pass the posts and follow this dirt road. Shortly you will find another sign reading “Dog Lake and Young Lake.” Continue on this road across a meadow, a granite slab, and into the forest. On a tree will be a small aluminum sign pointing right to the trail. Simply follow this well worn trail to the lake. Signs near the lake will prevent your following the Young Lake trail.

To return, retrace your route up. As an alternative, walk around the lake on the southerly side about half way, and you will find a fairly well-defined trail which will take you down to the main road. Cross the main road, walking through the forest until you come to the small road that runs to the Tuolumne Lodge. When you find this road, turn right and follow it back to the point of origin. The distance from the lake to the main road is one mile.

Special features: Trees: Though you will encounter mostly lodgepole pine (3, p. 21) it is possible to find mountain hemlock (3, p. 34) on your way up the ridge, as well as western white pine (3, p. 16). On the circle return trip watch for a few

Mts. Dana and Gibbs dominate the skyline in this view from Dog Lake.
    Anderson, NPS
[click to enlarge]
Mts. Dana and Gibbs dominate the skyline in this view from Dog Lake.  Anderson, NPS
California red fir (3, p. 29) off the trail.

Several meadows will be encountered near the lake. Here myriad wildflowers will beg identification, and never possession. Of course, it is against park policy to pick any of them. In season watch for wild carrot, red heather in the gravel slopes, especially, in the wet spots, and Mariposa lily.

At the lake, you may see California gulls and other birds mentioned in the Lembert Dome hike. Listen for the raucous cry of Clark’s nutcracker, especially when climbing the ridge by Lembert Dome.

The “T” blazes on the trees on your return trip were placed there by the Army about 50 years ago, when part of their function was to patrol this back country to keep out sheepherders and cattlemen, as well as to establish trails.

Mountain Hemlock
    McCrary, NPS
[click to enlarge]
Mountain Hemlock. McCrary, NPS


Next: III. Elizabeth LakeContentsPrevious: I. Lembert Dome

Home A - Z FAQ Art Prints Online Library Discussion Forum Muir Weather Maps About Search
Online Library: Title Author California Geology History Indians Muir Mountaineering Nature Management

http://www.yosemite.ca.us/library/tuolumne_meadows_trails/dog_lake.html