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Yosemite: Its Wonders and Its Beauties (1868) by John S. Hittell

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BEST GENERAL VIEW.

The best general view of the valley is to be obtained from Komah Point, on the Mariposa trail, about a mile from the edge of the valley, and about 1,500 feet above its level. Two miles and a half farther from the valley, and at a greater height, is Inspiration Point, from which a very good view can be had. Prof Prof. Whitney says:

“At a little distance from the [Coulterville] trail on the southern or right-hand side [east of Crane Flat] is a place from which a partial view of the Yosemite Valley can be obtained. It is not a satisfactory one, however, on account of the number of trees in the way, and the bend in the valley itself, which cuts off the view of all the upper part. In this respect, it is inferior to the birds-eye view of the Yosemite and all its surroundings, which is had from Inspiration Point, on the Mariposa trail into the valley, and approaching it from the south. Those who desire to have the finest and most comprehensive view of the whole scene at the first, should enter the valley by the Mariposa, and return by the Coulterville trail; those, on the other hand, who would reserve to the last the grandest effect of all, and who would wait until they have become familiar with the details, before having the whole scene spread out before them, will do well to reverse the order of their coming and going.”"

Mr. Bowles says of the view from Inspiration Point:

“The overpowering sense of the subtime, of awful desolation, of transcending marvelousness and unexpectedness, that swept over us, as we reined our horses sharply out of green forests, and stood upon a high jutting rock that overlooked this rolling, upheaving sea of

III. Tutucanula, (Great Chief the Valley of) El Capitan, from the South-east, a mile off, 3,300 feet above the Valley.
III. Tutucanula, (Great Chief the Valley of) El
Capitan,
from the South-east, a mile off, 3,300 feet above the Valley.
granite mountains holding, far down in its rough lap, this vale of meadow and grove and river-such a tide of feeling, such stoppage of ordinary emotions, comes at rare intervals in any life. It was the confrontal of God face to face, as in great danger, in sudden death. It was Niagara magnified, All that was mortal shrank back; all that was immortal swept to the front and bent down in awe.”


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