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Yosemite: the Park and its Resources (1987) by Linda W. Greene


APPENDIXES

A: C. Hart Merriam, “Indian Village and Camp Sites in Yosemite Valley,” Sierra Club Bulletin 10, No. 2 (January 1917) 1063
B: Chronological Overview of Archeological Investigation in Yosemite National Park 1069
C: Rules and Regulations for the Government of the Yosemite Valley and Mariposa Big Tree Grove 1075
D: Legislation Pertaining to Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Big Tree Grove 1081
E: Administrators of the Yosemite Valley and Mariposa Big Tree Grove, 1866-1960 1087
F: Historical Components of Concession Operations, June-July 1923 1089
G: building Inventory, Yosemite National Park 1105

APPENDIX A
Indian Village and Camp Sites in Yosemite Valley

by C. Hart Merriam
from: Sierra Club Bulletin 10, no. 2 (January 1917): 202-9


Indian Village and Camp Sites in Yosemite Valley*

By C. Hart Merriam

*This article was written in 1910, during which year I was able to complete the list of villages from the head of Yosemite Valley to Ferguson Station on the Merced, about six miles below El Portal. I had previously obtained and published the villages from Horseshoe Bend down the Merced as far as the territory of the tribe extended, and was anxious to fill the gap between Soo-no-koo-loon at Ferguson and Se-sau'-che at Horseshoe Bend. Not having been able to do this, it seems hardly worth while to defer publication longer.

For ages before its discovery by white men Yosemite Valley was inhabited by Indians. Owing to its isolated position and the abundance of mountain trout, quail, grouse, deer, bear, and other game animals, and of acorns, manzanita-berries, and other vegetable foods, it supported a large population. This is attested not only by the statements of the Indians themselves, but also by the surprisingly large number of villages whose locations have been determined. These were of three kinds:. (1) permanent villages, occupied the year round, though somewhat depleted in winter; (2) summer villages, occupied from Alay to October, after which the inhabitants moved down into the milder climate of Merced Cañon, where there was little or no snow; and (3) seasonal camps for hunting and fishing. The camps were definitely located and each was regularly occupied at a particular season.

It has not always been possible to distinguish between village-sites and camp-sites, but, taken collectively, I have been able, with the help of resident Indians., to locate and name no less than thirty-seven. All of these were in the valley proper, and at least six were occupied as late as 1898. To the list I have added sixteen located in the cañon of the Merced from the Cascades to Ferguson Station, six miles below El Portal, making in all fifty-three villages and camps in a distance of about twenty-two miles; and doubtless there were others which my informants had forgotten.

All of these people belonged to the Ahwaneche or Ahwah'-nee Mew'-wah, a subtribe closely akin to the neighboring Chow-chil'-la Mew'-wah of Chowchilla Cañon. Their language is the southernmost of the three dialects of the once great M-wuk family—a family comprising a group of closely related tribes occupying the western foothills and lower slopes of the Sierra Nevada from Cosumnes River south to Fresno Creek.

ORIGIN OF THE NAME YOSEMITE

In this connection it is interesting to recall how the name Yosemite originated. In the early spring of 1851 the valley was invaded by an Indian-chasing expedition. The word Yosemite, said to be the name of the native Indian tribe, was proposed by Dr. L. H. Bunnell, a member of the expedition, and accepted by the others while still in the valley.* During the early fifties there was some controversy between Bunnell and Hutchings as to whether the proper form was Yo-sem'-i-te or Yo-ham'-i-te (or Yo-hem'-i-te). Hutchings was right, Yo-ham'-i-te being the name of the band inhabiting a large and important village on the south bank of Merced River at the place now occupied by Sentinel Hotel and its cottages. These Indians hunted the grizzly bear, whose name—Oo-ho-ma-te or O-ham'-i-te—gave origin to their own. The tribe next north of the valley called the grizzly Oo-so-ma-te, which doubtless accounts for the euphonious form given by Bunnell and now universally accepted.

[* L. H. Bunnell, "How the Yo-Semite Valley was Discovered and Named," Hutchings California Magazine, pp. 498-504, San Francisco, May, 1859.]

[Editor’s note: For the correct origin of the word Yosemite see “Origin of the Word Yosemite.”—DEA.]

PECULIAR CLASSIFICATION OF THE VILLAGES

The villages and camps were sharply divided into two categories—those north of Merced River and those south of it. This division has a far deeper and more ancient significance than that indicated by the mere position of the villages with respect to the river, for it goes back to the underlying totemic beliefs that form an important part of the religion of this primitive people.

If one of the survivors is questioned as to the location of the villages, he in replying constantly makes use of the terms inside and outside as denoting one or the other side of the valley; and if the inquiry is pressed a little farther it soon develops that there is a grizzly-bear side and a coyote side, a land side (Too-no-kah), and a water side (Kik-ko-ah). This perplexing state of affairs leads to the interesting discovery that after all there are only two sides, but that each of them has four names: that the north side, inside, grizzly-bear side, and land side are one and the same—namely, the side north of Merced River; while the south side, outside, coyote side, and water side are only so many different names for the side south of Merced River.

The names most commonly used by the Indians themselves for the two sides are Oo-ho-mă-tāt ko-t-wahk (or Oo-ho-mă-te ha-wā'-ah), the grizzly-bear side, and Ah-hā'-leet ko-t-wahk (or Ah-hā'-le ha-wā'-ah), the coyote side—from Oo-ho-ma-te, the bear, and Ah-hā'-le, the coyote, respectively.

It is not difficult to see how Oo-ho-ma-te, the bear, an important personage among the early animal-people, might be chosen to represent the land animals; but why Ah-h-le, the coyote, should stand for the water-people is not so obvious. For the explanation one must look far back into the mythology of these Indians, in which it appears that before there were any real people in the world Ah-h-le, the coyote-man, one of the early divinities of the animal-people, came over the ocean from beyond the sea—for which reason he is ranked with the water-people.

Returning to our more immediate subject, the village and camp sites of Yosemite Valley, it is now easier to understand the grouping employed by the Indians. Indians are naturally methodical, and it is their custom to classify objects and places, and in speaking of them to begin at a fixed point and proceed in orderly sequence. Thus, in seeking the names of animals and plants and of geographic locations, I have several times provoked the undisguised disgust of my informant by not putting my questions in what he or she deemed the proper sequence.

In enumerating the village and camp sites of Yosemite Valley the Indians begin at the upper (or east) end of the north side—the grizzly-bear side—and proceed westerly to Til-til'-ken-ny at the lower end of the valley, and then cross the Merced to the south side—the coyote side—and return easterly to the upper end.

Following this sequence, the names and locations of the villages and camps are as follows:

ON THE NORTH (OR GRIZZLY-BEAR) SIDE—OO-HO-MA-TAT KO-T-WAHK

1. Hoo-k-hahtch'-ke.—Situated at the extreme upper end of the valley between Merced River and Tenaya Creek, and just below the mouth of Tenaya Cañon. A summer village inhabited up to about twenty years ago.

2. Hol'-low', or Lah'-ko-hah.—Indian cave, immediately under Washington Column at the mouth of Tenaya Cañon; a low, broad, and deep recess under a huge rock. Said to have been occupied as a winter shelter, and also when attacked by the Mono Lake Piutes. The overhanging rock is black from the smoke of ages, and far back in the cave large quantities of acorn-shells have been found. The word Lah-ko-hah, often applied to Indian Cave, is a call meaning "come out."

3. Wis'-kah-lah.—A large summer camp on a northward bend of Merced River, a little west of Royal Arches. Western part of site now occupied by a small settlement known as Kinneyville.

4. Y-watch-ke (sometimes nicknamed Mah-ch-to, meaning "edge" or "border," because of its position on the border of the valley).—Large village at mouth of Indian Cañon; still occupied. The slightly sloping gravel and sand "fan" on which this village is situated is the warmest place in Yosemite Valley, having a southwesterly exposure and receiving a maximum of midday and afternoon sunshine. Several species of shrubs belonging to the Upper Sonoran zone—the one next below the Transition zone, in which Yosemite Valley lies—thrive on this hot sandy plain among and outside of the scattered ponderosa pines and black oaks. These are Ceanothus divaricatus, Rhus trilobata, Lupinus ornatus, Eriodictyon glutinosum, Pentstemon[sic] breviflorus.

5. Ah-wah'-ne.—Village on Black Oak Flat, extending from site of Galen Clark’s grave easterly nearly to Y-watch-ke. As in the case of most of the villages, the village name was applied also to a definite tract of land belonging to it. This area, in the case of Ah-wah'-ne, was a piece of level ground of considerable size, beginning on the west along a north and south line passing through Sentinel Hotel and reaching easterly nearly to the mouth of Indian Cañon. The cemetery was on this tract, as was also the barn formerly belonging to J. B. Cooke. This being the largest tract of open level ground in the valley, the name Ah-wah'-ne came to be applied by outside Indians to the whole valley.

6. Koom-i-ne, or Kom-i-ne.—The largest and most important village in the valley, situated on the north side of the delta of Yosemite Creek just below Yosemite Fall (Ah-wah'-ning ch-luk-ah-hu, slurred to Ch-luk), and extending southwesterly at the base of the talus-slope under the towering cliffs for about three-quarters of a mile, reaching almost or quite to Three Brothers (Haw'-hawk). Old Chief Tenaya had a large earth-covered ceremonial-house (hang-e) by a big oak tree in this village. The Government soldiers stationed in the valley took possession of the site and established their camp there in 1907, forcing the Indians out. (Occupied by Indians during all my earlier visits.)

7. Wah-h-gah.—Small village about half a mile west-southwest of Koom-i-ne, on or near edge of meadow.

8. Soo-sem'-moo-lah.—Village at northwest end of old Folsom bridge (now the ford), less than half a mile south of Rocky Point.

9. Hah-ki-ah.—Large village only a short distance (less than one eighth mile) below Soo-sem'-moo-lah, and likewise south of Three Brothers (Haw'-hawk). A roundhouse, or hang-e, was located here, not far from old Folsom bridge. The three villages, Wah-h-gah, Soo-Sem'-oo-lah, and Hah-ki-ah, were inhabited up to about twenty years ago.

10. Kotm'-pom-p-sah, or Pom'-pom-p-sah.—Small village only a little below Hah-ki-ah, and also south of Three Brothers, or under the talus slope of the cañon immediately west of Three Brothers.

11. Aw'-o-koi-e.—Small village below and slightly east of the tall pine growing in a notch on the broad south face of El Capitan. The native Indian name of the gigantic rock cliff which we call El Capitan is To-t-kon oo-lah, from To-t-kon, the Sandhill Crane, a chief of the First People.

12. He-l-jah (the mountain lion).—Small village under El Capitan a little west of Aw'-o-koi-e.

13. Ha-eng'-ah.—Small village under El Capitan, and only a little west of He-l-jah.

14. Yu--chah.—Still another village under El Capitan, and only a short distance west of Ha-eng'-ah.

15. Hep-hep'-oo-ma.—Village where present Big Oak Flat road forks to leave the main road, south of the steep cañon which forms the west wall of El Capitan, and near west end of the big El Capitan Meadows (To-t-kon o-lah' i-e-hu). The five villages, Aw'-o-koi-e, He-l-jah, Ha-eng'-ah, Yu--chah, and Hep-hep'-oo-ma, were summer villages occupied from April to late October or early November.

16. Ti-e-t-mah.—Village only a short distance below Hep-hep'-oo-ma, and close to El Capitan bridge.

17. Ho-k-nah.—Small village a little below Ti-e-t-mah, and near site of old (shack) house.

18. W-tum-taw.—Village by a small meadow a short distance. below Ho-k-nah, and east of Black Spring.

19. Poot-poo-toon, or Put-put-toon.—Village in rocky place on north side of present road at Black Spring, from which it takes its name.

20. Ah-wah'-mah.—Lowermost (westernmost) village in Yosemite Valley, a short distance below Black Spring and above Til-til'-ken-ny, where the mail-carrier’s cabin is located.

VILLAGES ON THE SOUTH OR COYOTE SIDE—AH-H-LEET KO-T-WAHK

21. Sap-pah'-sam-mah.—Lowermost (most westerly) village or camp on south side of the valley, about half a mile east of Pohono Meadows.

22. Lem-m-hitch'-ke.—Small village or camp on east side of Pohono (or Bridal Veil) Creek, just below a very large rock.

23. Hop'-t-ne.—Small village or camp at base of westernmost of the lofty cliffs known as Cathedral Rocks, and close to south end of El Capitan bridge across Merced River.

24. W-sum-meh'.—Small village or camp at base of Cathedral Spires near the river, with a small meadow below; not far above Hop'-t-ne.

25. Kis'-se, or Kis'-se-uh.—Large village near the river, nearly opposite Hah-ki-ah. Kis'-se was the westernmost of the large villages on the south side. From it easterly they occurred at frequent intervals.

26. Ch-ch-kal-lah.—Large village just below old Folsom bridge (ford). Formerly a sweat-house (chap-po) here.

27. Ham'-moo-ah.—Village on Ford road, nearly opposite Three Brothers (Wah-hah'-kah).

28. Loi-ah.—Large village in open pine forest below Sentinel Rock (on ground now occupied by Camp Ahwahnee) and reaching down toward river. Occupied during my earlier visits-to the valley.

29. Ho-koo-m-ko-tah.—Village a little above Galen Clark’s house; looked out easterly over big meadow. Occupied during my earlier visits. (Hoo-koo-me is the great horned owl.)

30. Haw-kaw-ko-e-tah (Ho-kok'-kwe-lah, Haw-kaw'-koi*).—Large and important village on Merced River, where Sentinel Hotel and cottages now stand. Home of the band called Yo-ham'-i-te (or Yo-hem'-i-te), for whom the valley was named. The old woman Callipena was a Yo-ham'-i-te.

[*Named from How-kaw'-met-te, or How-wah-met-te, a rocky place.]

31. Ho-low.—Village on or near Merced River where the schoolhouse used to stand.

32. Wah'-tahk'-itch-ke.—Village on edge of meadow on south bend of Merced River near forks of road west of Le Conte Memorial. The wild pea (wah-tah'-kah) grows here.

33. Too-y-y-yu.—Large village on south bend of Merced River due. north of Le Conte Memorial and close to the bridge between Le Conte Memorial (or Camp Curry) and Kinneyville.

34. Too-lah'-kah'-twh.—Village or camp on open ground now occupied by orchard on east side of meadow north of Camp Curry.

35. Um'-ma-taw.—Large village on present wagon-road between Camp Curry and Happy Isles; was some distance from the river; water was fetched from a spring.

36. Ap'-poo-meh.—Camp on Merced River below Vernal Fall.

37. Kah-win'-na-bah'.—Large summer camp in Little Yosemite, whose name it bears.

VILLAGES IN MERCED CAÑON BELOW YOSEMITE VALLEY

There were no villages in the narrow Merced Cañon between the lower end of Yosemite Valley and the Cascades, where there were a few houses called Yi-yan'. This name also covered the ground from Cascade Creek to the junction of the Coulterville road.

The next village on the north side was at the terminus of the new railroad at El Portal (a distance of eight or nine miles), where the villages began and continued down-stream. Most of these were permanent, but they were far larger in winter than in summer, receiving material additions from Yosemite when cold weather set in.

Sit'-ke-no-al-lah.—Place and few houses on the south side of Merced River a little above (east of) El Portal; now Indian Wilson’s place.

Kep-pek'-oo-lah.—Place and small settlement on the south side of Merced River just above El Portal; now occupied by a white man. Named from the abundance of kep-pek' the brake fern (Pteris aquilina), the rootstocks of which the Indians use for the black design in their baskets.

Kah-wah'-koo-lah.—Place and small settlement on the south side of Merced River half a mile below Sit'-ke-no-al-lah and nearly opposite El Portal stable.

Sal-lah'-to.—Large village on flat now occupied by the railroad terminus at El Portal. The place at the mouth of Crane Creek at El Portal is called Sas'-oo-lah; formerly a few houses where the hotel stable now is.

Po-ko-n.—Village on the north side of the Merced a quarter of a mile west of El Portal. The flat gravel and pebble bench extending along the north side of the Merced for an eighth of a mile just below El Portal was known by the same name.

Cho-pi-tah, or Cho-pi-do.—Large village on the north side of Merced Cañon one or one and a half miles below El Portal, at the place called Rancheria Flat (immediately west of the present Hite Mine and northeast of the bend of the river).

To-yo'ng-am'.—Small village on top of a small pointed hill on the north side of the Merced at the bend of the river just below Hite Mine (really surrounded by Cho-pi-tah, being situated in the middle of the flat; may have been only a roundhouse).

So-wut-oo-lah'.—Large and important village on large oak-forested flat on the north side of the Merced, now Switch Flat (railroad switch), just west of Hogback Ridge, which separates it from Cho-pi-tah. Used to be a roundhouse (hang-e) here.

Oi-k-bah.—Very small old village at mouth of Moss Cañon, north side of the Merced; not room for many houses.

Kil'-mit-ten.—Big village on flat on the north side of the Merced just above the Government bridge.

Mo-lah-buk'-sa-bah'.—Village on the north side of the Merced just below and close to the Government bridge.

Haw'-too-too.—Village on the north side of the Merced. Old cabin there now, opposite the present Indian ranch where Big Nancy and others live.

Muh-ch-kah-n.—Old village on the south side of the Merced, at present occupied by Big Nancy, Callipena, and Lucy Ann.

Wah'ng'-oo-hah.—Village on small flat on the north side of Merced Cañon, a little above the mill at Ferguson Mine.

Soo-no-koo-loon'.—Village on the north side of Merced Cañon, at present Ferguson Station, six miles below El Portal.


APPENDIX B
Chronological Overview of Archeological Investigations in Yosemite National Park

by Judy Rosen, Environmental Specialist, DSC

The following presents in chronological order the major archeological projects conducted in Yosemite National Park. For more detailed information, refer to Appendix A in Dr. L. Kyle Napton’s Archeological Overview of Yosemite National Park, California, Part 2.

1851:

Indian villages were observed by members of the Mariposa Battalion upon their arrival in Yosemite Valley and were recorded by Bunnell in 1880. The five villages found in the valley appear to be situated upon previous remains, representing the terminal stages of an archeological continuum.

1880s:

Collection of Indian artifacts, especially basketry, as early as 1886 when Hutchings reports relics kept at Galen Clark’s cabin in Wawona.

1908:

First descriptive report of archeological site in Yosemite by E. W. Harnden who visited pictograph site in Pate Valley. This is one of the largest such sites in the Sierra Nevada.

1917:

C. H. Merriam’s publication of ethnographic data relative to the locations of thirty-seven Indian village sites along the Merced River in the Yosemite Valley and El Portal areas.

1930:

Reported in Yosemite Nature Notes and in manuscripts are significant archeological discoveries. Also, Rangers C. C. Presnall and C. A. Harwell conducted the first formal archeological survey in Yosemite in this year, locating seven archeological sites in the environs of Big Meadow.

1940 - 1950:

Archeological surveys informally conducted by park naturalist R. Mclntyre in the central portion of the park. He located more than 100 sites, which he plotted on a base map. This data proved invaluable for survey parties in 1952. In 1949 Archeologist Robert F. Heizer visited Yosemite and recorded several sites.

1951:

University of California, Berkeley, conducts surveys at Lake Eleanor.

1952 - 1954:

NPS contracted with University of California, Berkeley, to examine areas in the park subject to heavy visitor use. Field crews led by James Bennyhoff and Gordon Grosscup recorded more than 300 archeological sites and projected data against Sierran ecology, physiography, and prehistory, and the ethnographic work of Merriam. These constitute the first known controlled archeological excavations in the park and determined three complexes in park prehistory: Crane Flat, 2000 BC-500 AD; Tamarack, 500 AD-1200 AD; and Mariposa, 1200 AD-1850 AD.

1956:

Bennyhoff conducted archeological reconnaissance in Yosemite to inventory sites and assess tourist impacts in high-use areas.

1959:

R. J. Fitzwater of the University of California, Los Angeles, conducted a major salvage excavation on a Miwok site identified by Merriam as Choopitah (4-Mrp-181) one mile east of El Portal in the Merced River canyon, recovering more than 1,400 artifacts and 23 inhumations. Though this site exhibited very scarce lithic debitage, it is remarkable for its depth and number of inhumations recovered.

1960:

Another salvage project was conducted in Yosemite when the realignment of California Highway 120 transgressed 4-Mrp-105 (Crane Flat), producing 2,820 artifacts but no inhumations. Expanded housing construction spurred another salvage project on the northwest side of the park at Hodgdon Meadow, five miles from Crane Flat. This site (4-Tuo-236) is notable for the large number of bedrock mortar cups and for the richness of the site deposit.

1969:

Another limited salvage project in Yosemite Valley prior to construction of the new Interp/Visitor Center, was located within the perimeter of Awahnee (Site 4-Mrp-56), one of the principal Indian villages. Under contract with the NPS, excavations by J. Rasson of University of California, Los Angeles, revealed extensively disturbed subsurface archeological deposits. Test pits produced 249 artifacts.

1973:

Skeleton of young female Indian discovered during excavation of a horse barn foundation in headquarters ara. Recorded and examined by physical anthropologist and ceremonially reinterred by local Indians.

1974:

The first formal archeological surveys conducted in the park in more than twenty years carried out by Dr. L. Kyle Napton and field parties from Institute for Archeological Research, California State College, Stanislaus, Turlock. Sites subject to impact under the park DCP were studied, including: small acreages at Glacier Point, Badger Pass, Bavarian Village, and extensive DCP areas in Wawona on the South Fork of the Merced River, and almost the entire floor of Yosemite Valley. This resulted in the discovery of seventeen previously unrecorded sites in Wawona and forty-two unrecorded on the valley floor, increasing the archeological resources to ninety-eight in the valley.

1975:

Additional archeological surveys contracted by NPS with California State College, Stanislaus, in 15 areas to be affected by development increased the previously identified 81 archeological sites to 158 in those areas. Reports by Napton and Greathouse (1976, 1977.)

1976 - 1977:

Survey of 106 miles of backcountry trails in Yosemite through NPS contract by the Institute for Archeological Research, California State College, Stanislaus, Turlock, located, recorded, photographed, and evaluated 69 sites, 20 of which had been previously recorded. Covering 140 miles of corridor, the majority of backcountry trails receiving intensive visitor use were surveyed.

1980:

Wawona testing (Whittaker).

1981:

Yosemite Archeological Research Design (Moratto).

1981:

El Portal testing (Baumler and Carpenter).

1983:

Wawona testing (Ervin).

El Portal testing (Riley).

1984:

Wawona testing and survey in support of proposed construction of sewage and water systems. Investigations carried out at ten additional sites in Wawona and Section 35 areas.

South Entrance/Mariposa Grove survey in support of tram staging study comprehensive design and reconstruction of grove road. Nine new sites recorded.

Yosemite Valley testing at two sites in support of rehabilitation of water and electrical systems.

Tioga Road survey from Big Oak Flat entrance to White Wolf in support of road rehabilitation plans. Crane Flat area also surveyed. Fourteen new sites recorded.

Glacier Point Road survey between Chinquapin and Glacier Point in support of planned rehabilitation and construction work. Nine sites recorded.

Wawona Hotel archeological monitoring.

Pate Valley district survey.

Wawona Meadow survey.

Merced Lake survey.

1985:

Yosemite Valley testing and survey.

Wawona testing.

Glacier Point Road testing.

Tioga Road survey.

South Entrance testing.

El Portal testing.

Lake Eleanor survey.

SUMMARY

Because less than five percent of the park has been subject to survey, the total of archeological cultural resources could exceed several thousand. The present total is inflated by intensive surveys of three areas: Wawona, Tuolumne Meadows, and Yosemite Valley, all extensively occupied by Native Americans. The entire northern area and the most southern reaches of the park have not been extensively surveyed.

Survey efforts to date have been directed toward recognition of cultural resources within heavily used areas and areas which may be developed for use in the future. The most serious deficiency in the survey records for Yosemite National Park lies in incomplete knowledge of backcountry sites. Currently, only 146 of the total 750-mile trail network (19.5%) have been surveyed for archeological material. The survey mileage includes the most intensively used trails within the park. Information regarding historical/archeological values (trash dumps and the like) is imperfectly recorded at present.


APPENDIX C
Rules and Regulations for the Government of the Yosemite Valley and Mariposa Big Tree Grove

I.

No person shall reside or transact business within the Yosemite Valley and Mariposa Big Tree Grant, without written permission from the Commissioners.

II.

No application for residence or privilege to transact business within the Valley or Grove shall be considered if the applicant be in arrears to the Commission. Applicants must be in good standing.

III.

Any person having permission to reside and transact business within the Valley or Grove, who shall transfer or sublet the whole or any part of the premises or business in said permit without the written consent of the Commission, shall, ipso facto, forfeit the same.

IV.

The Guardian shall report to the Executive Committee all parties residing or transacting business within the Grant without permission, and shall cause the discontinuance of such residence or business.

V.

No person residing or transacting business within the Grant shall retain in his or her employ any person who is detrimental to good order or morals.

VI.

Upon complaint to the Commission, made by the Guardian, against any person specified in Rule V, the employer of such objectionable person shall be notified of the facts, and the employe [sic] must be dismissed.

VII.

Any employer neglecting or refusing to dismiss such objectionable employee, shall thereby forfeit his permission to reside or transact business within the Grant.

VIII.

No person shall be employed as guide who is not of good moral character, and approved by the Guardian.

IX.

The Guardian shall, upon complaint of any tourist or visitor, of the conduct or behavior of a guide, inquire into the cause, and advise the complainant of the result, enforcing Rule V if necessary.

X.

The Guardian is empowered to suspend a guide from his privilege during the investigation of charges preferred against said guide. If the guide be found in fault, he shall be dismissed, in accordance with Rule V.

XI.

The Guardian shall inspect all horses, their trappings, and all vehicles used for hire; and if any such horses, trappings, or vehicles shall by him be deemed unsuitable or unsafe, he shall cause the same to be removed at once from the Valley or Grove.

XII.

Any person offering for hire, or otherwise, any horse, trapping, or vehicle, or refusing or neglecting to remove the same from the grant, after the Guardian shall have condemned the same, shall forfeit his privilege to reside or transact business within the grant.

XI.

The Guardian shall direct campers to the grounds set apart for their use while within the grant, and shall establish such rules as will contribute to their comfort.

XIV.

No camp fires shall be permitted within the grant of either Valley or Grove, without the express permission of the Guardian.

XV.

The Guardian shall promptly cause the arrest of any person violating Rule XIV, and prosecute the offender to the full extent of the law, under Section 6 of the Act of April 2, 1866, as found in the last division of this book.

XVI.

No trees shall be cut or injured, or any natural object defaced.

XVII.

The discharge of firearms, either in the Valley or Grove, is strictly prohibited.

XVIII.

No horses, cattle, or stock of any kind shall be allowed to run at large within the grant, except under permission given in writing to the owner or owners thereof.

XIX.

Campers and all others, save those holding license from the Commission, are prohibited from hiring their horses, trappings, or vehicles to tourists or visitors within the grant.

XX.

Stages entering the valley shall stop at each hotel in the order of location, that passengers may exercise the right of selection.

XXI.

Rates of charges at hotels, and also for horses, trappings, or vehicles, or for provender, as published by the Commission from time to time, must not be exceeded, under pain of forfeiture of privilege to keep hotel, to conduct the livery business, or to sell provender.

XXII.

The Guardian shall notify the managers of hotels of any action of the Commission forbidding any objectionable person from residing or transacting business in the Valley or Grove.

XXI.

The Guardian shall, from time to time, enter all tenements, for the purpose. of inspecting sanitary conditions, and of examining the property in pursuance of his official duties.

XXIV.

No buildings or improvements of any kind shall be erected, or made upon the grant, without written authority from the Commission.

XXV.

All buildings and improvements of every kind erected, or made upon the grant, belong to the grant, and shall be so recognized and treated.

XXVI.

No person shall drive or ride faster than a walk over any of the bridges.

XXVII.

The Guardian shall exercise general police supervision in the Valley and Grove, and shall forbid and prevent all acts that tend to a breach of the peace or the discomfort of visitors, or the injury or destruction of property.

XXVIII.

All action of the Guardian shall be in response to orders communicated to him by the Executive Committee. He shall make no purchases, nor shall he incur any liability without specific authority. And he must refer all questions of policy, touching the management of the trust, to the Executive Committee for its decision. He must promptly remit all collections to the Secretary and Treasurer, and is specially forbidden to disburse any funds of the Commission, unless directed so to do by the Executive Committee. His vouchers must be full and self-explanatory, and must be taken by him in triplicates; one of them to be retained in his office in the Valley, and the other two transmitted to the Secretary and Treasurer. His accounts, covering the month last past, shall be made up and forwarded to the Executive Committee on the first of each month. He shall also transmit to the committee his estimate of material and supplies necessary, and await the approval of the same before purchasing. No standing timber shall be cut without special authority from the Executive Committee.


APPENDIX D
Legislation Pertaining to Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Big Tree Grove

An Act Authorizing the Grant to the State of California
of the Yosemite Valley and Mariposa Big Tree Grove,
30 June 1864 (13 STAT., 325)

“Section 1. That there shall be, and is hereby granted to the State of California, the “cleft” or “gorge” in the Granite Peak of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, situated in the county of Mariposa, in the State aforesaid, and the headwaters of the Merced River, and known as the Yosemite Valley, with its branches and spurs, in estimated length, fifteen miles, and in average width, one mile back from the main edge of the precipice on each side of the valley; with the stipulation, nevertheless, that the said State shall accept this grant upon the express conditions that the premises shall be held for public use, resort, and recreation, and shall be inalienable for all time; but leases, not extending more than ten years, may be granted for portions of said premises. All incomes derived from leases of privileges to be expended in the preservation and improvement of the property or the roads leading thereto. The boundaries to be established at the cost of said State, by the United States Surveyor-General of California, whose official plat, when affirmed by the Commissioner of the General Land Office, shall constitute the evidence of the locus, extent, and limits of said cleft or gorge; the premises to be managed by the Governor of the State, with eight other Commissioners, to be appointed by the Executive of California, and who shall receive no compensation for their services.

“Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, that there shall likewise be, and there is hereby granted to the State of California, the tracts embracing what is known as “Mariposa Big Tree Grove;” not to exceed the area of four sections, and to be taken in legal subdivisions of one quarter section each, with the like stipulation as expressed in the first section of this Act, as to the State’s acceptance, with like conditions as in the first section of this Act, as to inalienability, yet with the same lease privilege; the income to be expended in preservation, improvement, and protection of the property; the premises to be managed by Commissioners, as stipulated in the first section of this Act, and to be taken in legal subdivision as aforesaid; and the official plat of the United States Surveyor-General, when affirmed by the Commissioner of the General Land Office, to be the evidence of the locus of said Mariposa Big Tree Grove.”

[Chapter CLXXXIV of the Statutes at Large, passed at the Thirtieth Congress, session one.]

 

An Act to Accept the Grant by the United States Government to the State of California of the Yosemite Valley and Big Tree Grove, and to Organize the Board of Commissioners, and to Fully Empower Them to Carry Out the Objects of the Grant, and Fulfill the Purposes of the Trust.

[Approved April 2, 1866.]

“Whereas, By an Act of Congress, entitled an Act authorizing a grant to the State of California of the Yosemite Valley, and of the land embracing the Mariposa Big Tree Grove, approved June thirtieth, A. D. eighteen hundred and sixty-four, there was granted to the State of California in the terms of said Act said valley and the lands embracing said grove, upon certain conditions and stipulations therein expressed; now, therefore,

The People of the State of California, represented in Senate and Assembly, do enact as follows:

“Section 1. The State of California does hereby accept said grant upon the conditions, reservations, and stipulations contained in said Act of Congress.

“Sec. 2. The Governor, and the eight other Commissioners, Frederick Law Olmsted, Prof. J. D. Whitney, William Ashburner, I. W. Raymond, E. S. Holden, Alexander Deering, George W. Coulter, and Galen Clark, appointed by him on the twenty-eighth day of September, eighteen hundred and sixty-four, in accordance with the terms of said Act, are hereby constituted a Board to manage said premises, and any vacancy occurring therein from death, removal, or any cause, shall be filled by the appointment of the Governor. They shall be known in law as “The Commissioners to Manage the Yosemite Valley and the Mariposa Big Tree Grove,” and by such name they and their successors may sue and be sued, and shall have full power to manage and administer the grant made, and the trust created by said Act of Congress, and shall have full power to make and adopt all rules, regulations, and by-laws for their own government and the government, improvement, and preservation of said premises, not inconsistent with the Constitution of the United States, or of this State, or of said Act making the grant, or of any law of Congress, or of the Legislature. They shall hold their first meeting at the time and place to be specified by the Governor, and thereafter as their own rules shall prescribe, and a majority shall constitute a quorum for the transaction of business. They shall elect a President and Secretary, and any other officers from their number, as their rules may prescribe.

“Sec. 3. None of the said Commissioners shall receive any compensation for their services as such. They shall have the power to appoint a Guardian, either of their number or not, of said premises, removable at their pleasure, to perform such duties as they may prescribe, and to receive such compensation as they may fix, not to exceed five hundred dollars per annum.

“Sec. 4. The Commissioners shall make a full report of the condition of said premises, and of their acts under this law, and of their expenditures, through the Governor, to the Legislature, at every regular session thereof.

“Sec. 5. The State Geologist is hereby authorized to make such further explorations on the said tract, and in the adjoining regions of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, as may be necessary to enable him to prepare a full description and accurate statistical report of the same, and the same shall be published in connection with the reports of the Geological Survey.

“Sec. 6. It shall be unlawful for any person willfully to commit any trespass whatever upon said premises, cut down or carry off any wood, underwood, tree, or timber, or girdle or otherwise injure any tree or timber, or deface or injure any natural object, or set fire to any wood or grass upon said premises, or destroy or injure any bridge or structure of any kind, or other improvement that is, or may be, placed thereon. Any person committing either or any of said acts, without the express permission of said Commissioners, through said Guardian, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and, on conviction thereof, shall be punished by fine not exceeding five hundred dollars, or by imprisonment in the county jail not exceeding six months, or by both such fine and imprisonment.

“Sec. 7. The sum of two thousand dollars is hereby appropriated for the eighteenth and nineteenth fiscal years, out of any moneys in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, to pay said Guardian, and the incidental expenses of the Commissioners, and to be expended under the supervision of said Commissioners; provided, that not more than one half of said sum shall be expended during the eighteenth fiscal year.

“Sec. 8. This Act shall take effect immediately.”

[Chapter DXXXVI of the Statutes of California, passed at the sixteenth session of the Legislature, 1865-6.]

 

ACT OF OCTOBER 1, 1890 (26 STAT., 650).1

AN ACT To set apart certain tracts of land in the State of California as forest reservations.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the tracts of land in the State of California known as described as follows: Commencing at the northwest corner of township two north, range nineteen east Mount Diablo meridian, thence eastwardly on the line between townships two and three north, ranges twenty-four and twenty-five east; thence southwardly on the line between ranges twenty-four and twenty-five east to the Mount Diablo base line; thence eastwardly on said base line to the corner to township one south, ranges twenty-five and twenty-six east; then southwardly on the line between ranges twenty-five and twenty-six east to the southeast corner of township two south, range twenty-five east; then eastwardly on the line between townships two and three south, range twenty-six east to the corner to townships two and three south, ranges twenty-six and twenty-seven east; thence southwardly on the line between ranges twenty-six and twenty-seven east to the first standard parallel south; thence westwardly on the first standard parallel south to the southwest corner of township four south, range nineteen east; thence northwardly on the line between ranges eighteen and nineteen east to the northwest corner of township two south, range nineteen east; thence westwardly on the line between townships one and two south to the southwest corner of township one south, range nineteen east; thence northwardly on the line between ranges eighteen and nineteen east to the northwest corner of township two north, range nineteen east, the place of beginning, are hereby reserved and withdrawn from settlement, occupancy, or sale under the laws of the United States, and set apart as reserved forest lands; and all persons who shall locate or settle upon, or occupy the same or any part thereof, except as hereinafter provided, shall be considered trespassers and removed therefrom: Provided, however, That nothing in this act shall be construed as in anywise affecting the grant of lands made to the State of California by virtue of the act entitled, ‘An act authorizing a grant to the State of California of the Yosemite Valley, and of the land embracing the Mariposa Big-Tree Grove,’ appeared June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and sixty-four; or as affecting any bona-fide entry of land made within the limits above described under any law of the United States prior to the approval of this act.

“Sec. 2. That said reservation shall be under the exclusive control of the Secretary of the Interior, whose duty it shall be, as soon as practicable, to make and publish such rules and regulations as he may deem necessary or proper for the care and management of the same. Such regulations shall provide for the preservation from injury of all timber, mineral deposits, natural curiosities, or wonders within said reservation, and their retention in their natural condition. The Secretary may, in his discretion, grant leases for building purposes for terms not exceeding ten years of small parcels of ground not exceeding five acres; at such places in said reservation as shall require the erection of buildings for the accommodation of visitors; all of the proceeds of said leases and other revenues that may be derived from any source connected with said reservation to be expended under his direction in the management of the same and the construction of roads and paths therein. He shall provide against the wanton destruction of the fish, and game found within said reservation, and against their capture or destruction, for the purposes of merchandise or profit. He shall also cause all persons trespassing upon the same after the passage of this act to be removed therefrom, and, generally, shall be authorized to take all such measures as shall be necessary or proper to fully carry out the objects and purposes of this act.

[1. Sections 1 and 2 of this act pertain to the Yosemite National Park, while section 3 sets apart General Grant National Park, and also a portion of Sequoia National Park.]

 

Recession Act of the Legislature of the State of California, Approved March 3, 1905

“Sec. 1. The State of California does hereby recede and regrant unto the United States of America the ‘cleft’ or ‘gorge’ in the granite peak of the Sierra Nevada Mountains, situated in the county of Mariposa, State of California, and the headwaters of the Merced River, and known as the Yosemite Valley, with its branches and spurs, granted unto the State of California in trust for public use, resort, and recreation by the act of Congress entitled, ‘An act authorizing a grant to the State of California of the Yosemite Valley and of the land embracing the Mariposa Big Tree Grove,’ approved June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and sixty-four; and the State of California does hereby relinquish unto the United States of America and resign the trusts created and granted by the said act of Congress.

“Sec. 2. The State of California does hereby recede and regrant unto the United States of America the tracts embracing what is known as the ‘Mariposa Big Tree Grove,’ granted unto the State of California in trust for public use, resort, and recreation by the act of Congress referred to in section one of this act, and the State of California does hereby relinquish unto the United States of America and resign the trusts created and granted by the said act of Congress.

“Sec. 3. This act shall take effect from and after acceptance by the United States of America of the recessions and regrants herein made, thereby forever releasing the State of California from further cost of maintaining the said premises, the same to be held for all time by the United States of America for public use, resort, and recreation, and imposing on the United States of America the cost of maintaining the same as a national park: Provided, however, That the recession and regrant hereby made shall not affect vested rights and interests of third persons.”


APPENDIX E
Administrators of the Yosemite Valley and Mariposa Big Tree Grove, 1866-1960

1. Yosemite Guardians for the State of California
Name and TitlePeriod of Service
Galen Clark1866 to 1880
James M. Hutchings1880 to 1884
Walter E. Dennison1884 to 1887
Mark L. McCord1887 to 1889
Galen Clark1889 to 1897
Miles Wallace1897 to 1899
John Stevens1899 to 1904
George Harlow1904 to 1906
2. Acting Superintendents Under the War Department
Capt. Abram Epperson Wood5/17/1891 to 5/29/1893
Capt. George Henry Goodwin Gale5/25/1894 to 5/24/1895
Capt. Alexander Rodgers5/24/1895 to 5/18/1896
Lt. Col. Samuel Baldwin Marks Young5/18/1896 to 5/21/1897
Maj. Alexander Rodgers5/21/1897 to 6/16/1898
J. W. Zevely6/16/1898 to 9/24/1898
Capt. Joseph E. Caine9/24/1898 to 1/00/1899
Lt. W. H. McMasters1/00/1899 to 6/18/1899
Lt. William Forse6/18/1899 to 8/03/1899
Capt. Elon Farnsworth Willcox8/03/1899 to 10/28/1899
Maj. Louis Henry Rucker6/03/1900 to 9/15/1900
Maj. Louis Aleck Craig6/17/1901 to 10/10/1901
Maj. Otto Louis Hein6/26/1902 to 9/25/1902
Lt. Col. Joseph Garrard5/07/1903 to 10/08/1903
Maj. John Bigelow, Jr.5/23/1904 to 9/25/1904
Capt. Willard Herman McCornack9/25/1904 to 12/00/1904
Capt. Harry Coupland Benson1905 to 12/00/1905
Maj. Harry Coupland Benson5/25/1906 to 10/25/1908
Maj. William Woods Forsyth4/27/1909 to 9/30/1212
3. Superintendents Under the Department of the Interior
Mark Daniels, Act’g. Supt.7/10/1914 to 5/25/1915
George V. Bell6/01/1915 to 11/15/1915
Mark Daniels, Act’g. Supt.11/15/1915 to 12/09/1915
Gabriel Sovulewski, Supervisor12/09/1915 to 3/03/1916
Washington B. Lewis, Supervisor3/03/1916 to 11/01/1917
Washington B. Lewis11/01/1917 to 7/04/1928
Earnest P. Leavitt, Act’g. Supt.7/04/1928 to 2/15/1929
Charles Goff Thomson2/15/1929 to 3/22/1937
John B. Wosky, Act’g. Supt.3/22/1937 to 6/02/1937
Lawrence C. Merriam6/02/1937 to 8/01/1941
Frank A. Kittredge8/01/1941 to 12/01/1947
Carl P. Russell12/01/1947 to 11/01/1952
John C. Preston11/01/1952 to 12/30/1965
John M. Davis2/27/1966 to 1/13/1968
Lawrence C. Hadley1/28/1968 to 8/23/1970
Wayne B. Cone7/26/1970 to 8/22/1971
Lynn H. Thompson8/08/1971 to 1/06/1974
John M. Good, Act’g. Supt.1/07/1974 to 1/19/1974
Leslie P. Arnberger1/20/1974 to 7/13/1979
William N. Burgen, Act’g. Supt.7/14/1979 to 7/21/1979
Robert O. Binnewies7/22/1979 to 2/01/1986
James O. Laney, Act’g Supt.2/02/1986 to 2/16/1986
John M. Morehead2/16/1986 to

APPENDIX F
Historical Components of Concession Operations June-July 1923

This appendix contains historical data and structural information on properties in Yosemite National Park owned by the Yosemite National Park Company in 1923. The data was extracted from scrapbooks of the concessioner, housed in the Yosemite Research Library and Records Center, that were possibly part of an inventory of holdings made in anticipation of that company’s consolidation with the Curry Camping Company. These books contain a wealth of construction information and detailed pictures pertaining to the early facilities listed below. Most of the structures are no longer extant, although the housekeeping cabins in the Camp 17 employees area (H107-13) survive and have been referred to previously in this report as the “Ahwahnee Row Houses.”

General Office Group and Print Shop:

Locust Cottage [old Cosmopolitan Saloon] - ca. 1863 [1871] - used as manager’s office - one-story frame bldg. with six offices, one barbershop on first floor - originally used as saloon and recreation facility and then as guestrooms in connection with Sentinel Hotel; later remodelled for offices.

Ahwahnee Building - 1906 - used as general offices - one-story frame bldg. with four offices - originally used as office and lobby in Camp Ahwahnee, 1919; moved and remodelled for offices.

Old Sentinel Hotel Bathhouse - n. d. - used as architect’s office - one-story frame bldg. with three offices and one blueprint room - originally used as bathhouse in connection with Sentinel Hotel; in 1920 moved and rebuilt for [NPS?] offices.

Vault - 1920 - used as vault for safekeeping of valuable records against theft and fire - one-story stone bldg.

Printshop - 1900 - used as printshop - one-story frame bldg. - originally used as icehouse and warehouse; in 1921 rebuilt for printshop.

Store, Supply Warehouse, and Meat Market:

Village Group:

General Store - 1900 - used as store, cafeteria, supply warehouse, and post office - one- and two-story frame bldg. - originally building was only 43' x 44', two stories high, built by U. S. Army - gradually enlarged by Yosemite National Park Co.

Oriental Cottage - ca. 1900 - used as employees’ quarters -one-story frame bldg.

Meat Market & Ice Plant - 1911 - one-story frame bldg.

Store Manager’s Residence - 1916 - built from three portable cabins.

Bluebird Cottage - ca. 1900 - employees’ dormitory - one-story frame bldg.

General Manager’s Residence - 1916 - one-story frame bldg. - built from two portable cabins.

Hope Cottage and Old Transportation Building - 1882 - used as employees’ dormitory - one-story rustic frame bldg. - built and originally used by Wells Fargo Express Co. for transportation and express office; later rebuilt for living quarters.

Employees’ Laundry - ca. 1900 - laundry and dormitory for employees.

Wiggle Inn - ca. 1912 - employees’ dormitory - one-story frame bldg. - originally used as warehouse, later rebuilt for living quarters.

Field Barn - ca. 1912 - used as employees’ dormitory and warehouse - 1-1/2-story frame bldg. - originally used as barn and icehouse; rebuilt for living quarters and warehouse in 1922.

Old ice-house - ca. 1900 - used as employees’ quarters - one-story frame bldg. - originally built as icehouse, later warehouse and rebuilt for living quarters in 1922.

Fox Cottage - ca. 1900 - used as employees’ quarters - one-story frame bldg.

Toilet Building - 1916 - used as toilet - one-story portable section frame bldg.

Sentinel Hotel Group and Employees’ Quarters:

Sentinel Hotel - 1873 [1876] - used as hotel in winter, cafeteria in summer - two-story frame bldg. - in 1923 the former lavatory bldg. was rebuilt as a lobby on the first floor and connected with the main hotel structure; in summer 1923 the kitchen and dining room were remodelled with portable fixtures for cafeteria and operated as such for first time during overflow season.

Ivy Cottage - 1896 - used as hotel rooms - one-story frame bldg.

Cedar Cottage - 1859 - used as hotel rooms - two-story frame bldg. -originally used as hotel, being first one in valley - later used as dorm in summer, recreation room in winter.

Oak Cottage - 1882 - used as hotel rooms - two-story frame bldg.

Rock Cottage - ca. 1873 - used as dormitory and hotel rooms in emergencies in connection with Sentinel Hotel - 1-1/2-story frame bldg. - originally used as hotel rooms, then for printshop, cafeteria, photographic shop, offices; in 1922 rebuilt for dormitory; in February 1923 partly destroyed by fire, rebuilt in same year.

River Cottage - 1882 - used as hotel rooms - two-story frame building.

Lavatory Building - 1923 - used as lavatory and toilet for men - one-story frame bldg.

Canvas Cabins - 1923 - used as rooms for guests and employees - stationary frames, canvas removed in winter - twenty kept for guests and employees and warehouses (strengthened for winter).

Tents - forty-three tents behind Cedar and Oak cottages used for overflow guest accommodations in season.

Warehouses, Construction, and Equipment:

Warehouse Group:

Construction Warehouse No. 1 - 1920? - used as office and warehouse - one-story frame bldg.

Construction Warehouse No. 2 - 1920 - one-story frame bldg.

Construction Warehouse No. 3 - 1920 - one-story frame bldg.

Construction Warehouse No. 4 - 1920 - one-story frame bldg.

Construction Warehouse No. 5 - 1918 - one-story frame bldg. originally used as plumbing and carpenter shop, broken by snow 1921-22.

Old Blacksmith Shop - 1916 - used as paint shop - one-story frame bldg. - originally used as blacksmith shop; in 1923 remodelled for paint shop.

Storage Shed - 1922 - one-story frame bldg.

Employee’s Quarters - n. d. - used as mechanical engineer’s quarters - one-story frame bldg. - originally 12' x 16'; enlarged in 1922.

Carpenter, Plumber, and Electrician Shop - 1923 - one-story frame bldg.

Garage Group:

Garage - 1920 - used as main building - one-story frame with shake walls.

Car Shed and Paint Shop - 1920 - used as car shed, carwash, and paint shop - one-story frame building - contained twenty-one stalls for forty-two cars - paint shop originally used for car stalls; in 1921 built out for paint shop.

Toilet Building - 1920 - used as toilet, lavatory, bathhouse - one-story frame bldg. with shake walls.

Gas Station No. 1 - 1920 (1917?) - used as gas and oil station - one-story frame bldg. - originally only one car shelter, on north side of bldg.; car shelter on south built 1922.

New Garage Administration Building - 1922 - used as car storage bldg. - one-story frame bldg. with shake walls - built to be used as garage administration bldg. with future development.

Car Shed - 1922 - one-story frame bldg. with shake walls - one room for ten cars.

Kenneyville:

Stables and Employees’ Quarters:

Office Building - 1878 - used as office, bath, and toilet - one-story frame bldg. - rebuilt 1921.

Employees’ Quarters - 1878 - used as stable manager’s quarters one-story frame bldg. - remodelled 1921.

Employees’ Quarters - ca. 1890 - one-story frame bldg.

Employees’ Quarters - ca. 1890 - one-story frame bldg.

Blacksmith Shop - ca. 1888 - one-story frame bldg.

Saddlehouse and Haybarn - ca. 1888 - one-story frame bldg. - rebuilt 1921 and saddleroom added.

Barn - ca. 1888 - used as stable and hay and grain barn one-story frame bldg. - remodelled 1921.

Saddlehouse - 1921 - one-story frame bldg.

Barn - ca. 1888 - used as stable - one-story frame bldg. remodelled 1921.

Saddlehouse - 1921 - one-story frame bldg.

Barn - ca. 1888 - used as packhouse, storeroom, saddleshop - two-story frame bldg. - remodelled 1921.

Wagon Shed - ca. 1890 - used as car and wagon shed and for storage - one-story frame bldg. - storage room built 1923.

Barn - ca. 1888 - used as stable and for grain and hay storage - one-story frame bldg. - remodelled 1921.

Old Saddlehouse - ca. 1890 - one-story frame bldg. - remodelled 1921.

Employee’s Quarters - ca. 1890 - used as residence for superintendent of construction - one-story frame bldg. - remodelled 1921.

Gas and Oil Station No. 2 - 1920 - one-story frame bldg. - moved from Camp Curry to this site in 1922.

Yosemite Lodge:

Main Building - 1912 - used for administration - one-story frame bldg., b/b walls and siding - originally built and used by U. S. Army as barracks for soldiers; later remodelled and enlarged.

Car Shelter - 1916? - one-story log post bldg. with no walls - one room for twenty-nine cars.

Convention Tent - 1923 - used as car parking shelter and convention hall - one-story log post bldg. with no walls - one room for forty cars.

Bathhouse - 1916 - used as bathhouse, dressing rooms, and beauty parlor - one-story frame bldg. with shake walls.

Laundry Building - 1916 - one-story frame bldg. with shake walls.

Tailor Shop - 1916 - used as laundry office and tailor shop - one-story portable section frame bldg.

Linen Room - 1916 - used as linen storeroom - one-story portable section frame bldg. - originally used as two warehouses in different location; in 1921 moved to lodge area and rebuilt for linen storage room.

Public Bathhouse - 1916 - used as barbershop, public bath, employees’ quarters - one-story portable section frame bldg. - remodelled in 1922 - barbershop moved from east to west side of bldg. and two employees’ rooms put i n; in 1923 one employee room added.

Motion Picture Machine Building - 1922 - one-story frame bldg. with shake and canvas walls - originally platform only, enlarged in 1922.

Stage - 1916 - used for entertainment - one-story frame bldg. with shake walls - enlarged and rebuilt in 1923.

Linen Room - 1916 - used as linen supply room - one-story portable section frame bldg.

Lavatory Building - 1920 - used as lavatory, toilet, line room - one-story rustic frame bldg.

Log Warehouse - 1916 - used as storeroom - one-story log bldg.

Dane Pavilion - 1916 - used as dance pavilion and music stand.

Swinning Pool - 1916 - concrete.

Desmond, or Redwood, Cabins - 1916 - used as guest rooms - one-story portable section frame bldgs. - designed and built by Desmond Park Service Co. in 1915 - 115 of that type in use - two single beds in each, some with double beds.

Canvas Cabins - 1916 - used as guest rooms - one-story portable section frame bldgs. with canvas walls - built by Desmond Park Service Co. - thirty-nine in use - two single beds in each, some with double beds.

Double Bath Cabins - 1920 - used as guest rooms - one-story portable section frame bldgs. - thirty-five in use.

Single Bath Cabins - 1920 - used as guest rooms - one-story portable section frame bldgs. - thirty in use.

Double Canvas Cabins - 1916 - used as guest rooms - one-story portable section frame bldgs. with canvas walls - two in use.

Telephone Station - 1923 - box of boards for telephone on five-foot-high post - two in use.

Firehouse Shelter - 1920 - boards on elevated platform.

Yosemite Lodge Annex:

Men’s Bathhouse - 1916 - used as toilet, bath, and lavatory - one-story portable section frame bldg.

Boilerhouse - 1916 - used as boilet and linen room - one-story portable section frame bldg.

Women’s Bathhouse - 1916 - used as toilet, bath, lavatory - one-story portable section frame bldg.

Warehouse - 1916 - used as warehouse and dormitory during overflow - one-story portable section frame bldg. - five of this type building used as overflow dorms, each holding six to ten single beds.

Toilet Building - 1916 - used as women’s toilet - one-story portable section frame bldg.

Toilet Building - 1916 - used as men’s toilet - one-story portable section frame bldg.

Telephone and Ticket Office Building - 1916 - used as telephone and bathhouse and ticket office - one-story portable section frame bldg. - one room for telephone, one for bathhouse/ticket office.

Tennis Court - 1916 - used at times for convention hall, with canvas put over for roof and walls.

Old Government Barn - n. d. - used as car shed and barn - one-story frame bldg., partly open - originally built and used by U. S. Army for barn - in 1923 west section partitioned off for stall to house horses used in connection with children’s playground.

Canvas Cabins - 1916 - used as guest rooms - one-story portable section frame bldgs. with canvas walls - built by Desmond Park Service Co. - 205 in use.

Canvas Cabins or Tents - 1922 - used as guest rooms - one-story frame bldgs. with canvas walls - forty-eight in use.

Camp 17 Housekeeping Department (Upper Tecoya Area):

Housekeeping Camp Headquarters - n. d. - used as office and camping supply warehouse - one-story portable section frame bldg. - partly borken in winter 1921-22 - rebuilt 1922.

Refreshments Booth - 1922 - used as refreshment, curio, newspaper, cigar, botacco, and candy stand - one-story frame bldg. with shake and board walls.

Warehouse No. 1 - n. d. - used as storeroom for camp supplies - one-story portable section frame bldg.

Warehouse No. 2 - n. d. - one room used for storage of camping supplies - one-story frame bldg. with board walls.

Camp 17 Employees’ Quarters

Housekeeping Cabin, H101 - 1922 - used as employee residence - one-story frame and portable frame section bldg. - five of this type, H101-105, put up with new additions from two Desmond cabins each, which were formerly used for guest rooms in connection with Yosemite Lodge up to 1922.

Garage, H101A - 1922 - used as garage and storage room with employee residence - one-story frame bldg. with shake walls - seven of this type in use, H101A-107A.

Housekeeping Cabin, H106 - 1923 - used as employee residence - one-story frame bldgs. with shake walls - two of this type, H106-107.

Housekeeping Cabin, H108 - 1923 - used as employee residence - one-story hollow tile bldg., concrete found., hollow tile walls, roof of processed metal, T&G flooring, celotex walls.

Garage, H108A - 1923 and 1924 - used as garage and storage rooms for employees’ residences H108-109 - onestory frame bldg. (double garage).

Housekeeping Cabin, H109 - 1923 - used as employee residence - one-story frame bldg., concrete found., board and rails walls, shingle roof, T&G flooring.

Housekeeping Cabin, H110 - 1922 - used as employee residence - one-story stone bldg., concrete found., stone walls, asbestos shingle roof, T&G flooring.

Garage, H110A - 1923 and 1924 - used as garage and storeroom with employee residences - one-story frame bldg. with shake walls - four of this type in use (H110A-113A).

Housekeeping Cabin, H111 - 1923 - used as employee residence - one-story frame bldg., concrete found., process metal walls and roof, T&G flooring, celotex walls.

Housekeeping Cabin, H112 - 1923 - used as employee residence - one-story frame bldg., concrete found., stucco walls, shingle roof, T&G flooring.

Housekeeping Cabin, H113 - 1923 - used as employee residence - one-story frame bldg., concrete found., rustic logs and board walls, shake roof, T&G flooring.

Camp Tecoya:

Cafeteria - 1917 - for guests and employees - 1-1/2-story portable section frame bldg. - originally used as cafeteria for employees only; after 1921 used for guests on European Plan and at end of 1921 season, half of the dining room was used in connection with Yosemite Lodge for the American Plan.

Employees Laundry Building - 1917 - used as laundry - onestory portable section frame bldg.

Employees Bathhouse - 1917 - used as men’s toilet, bath, and lavatory - one-story frame bldg. with annex.

Lavatory and Boilerhouse - 1917 - used as women’s lavatory and toilet (guests only) - one-story portable section frame bldg. - originally used for darkroom and men’s laundry; rebuilt 1922.

Employees’ Bathhouse - 1917 - used as women’s toilet, bath, lavatory (employees only) - one-story frame bldg. with annex.

Old Linen House - 1918 - used as employee dormitory; during overflow in season used as guest rooms - one-story frame bldg. - originally used for linen and storage; rebuilt 1922 for bedrooms; bathroom added 1923.

Old Barbershop - 1917 - used as Tecoya manager’s living quarters - one-story portable section frame bldg. - originally barbershop.

Office Building - 1917 - used as office - one-story portable section frame bldg. with rustic log porch.

Linen Room - 1917 - one-story portable section frame bldg.

Hospital - 1917 - used as employee hospital - one-story portable section frame bldg. - originally used for dormitory, then as recreation room for employees; rebuilt 1922 as hospital.

Toilet Building - 1917 - used as women’s toilet - one-story frame bldg.

Warehouse - 1917 - used as dormitory during season and as warehouse for camp equipment during winter - one-story portable section frame bldg.

Toilet Building - 1917 - used as men’s toilet - one-story portable section frame bldg.

Warehouse - 1917 - used as dormitory and as warehouse in winter to store camping supplies - one-story portable section frame bldg.

Manzinita [sic] Cottage - 1918 - used as manager’s living quarters - one-story frame bldg. - bathroom built 1922.

Pumphouse - 1922 - one-story frame bldg.

Water Tank - 1918 - used for fire protection; water pumped from pumphouse - two-inch redwood planks with iron rods.

Tecoya Annex:

Housekeeping Cabin - 1917 - used as employee residence - one-story frame and portable frame section - original bldg. only 12’ x 18’ and used for guest housekeeping rooms in connection with Yosemite Lodge; rebuilt and enlarged 1922.

Housekeeping Cabin - 1917 - same as above.

Housekeeping Cabin - 1917 - same as above.

Housekeeping Cabin - 1917 - same as above.

Garage - 1922 - used as garage and storage room with residence one-story frame bldg. with shake wails.

Housekeeping Cabin - 1917 - same as above.

Housekeeping Cabin - 1917 - used as employee residence - one-story frame and portable frame section - original bldg. 18’ x 24’ and used as warehouse at Yosemite Lodge; remodelled and enlarged 1922.

Toilet Building - 1917 - used as wash and toilet rooms for women employees - one-story portable section frame bldg. - two portable section buildings put together.

Toilet Building - 1917 - used as women’s toilets (employees only) - one-story portable section frame bldg. - six portable section bldgs. put together.

Toilet Building - 1917 - used as women’s toilet (employees only) - one-story portable section frame bldg. - two portable section bldgs. put together.

Glacier Point Group:

Glacier Point Hotel and Mountain House:

Glacier Point Hotel - 1916-17 - two- and three-story frame bldg. with painted shake walls and shingle roof - normal capacity of 180 guests - operated on American Plan from opening in 1917 until end of 1920 season; after that, used for rooming of guests only in connection with Mountain House, which operated on European Plan - porte cochere broke in winter of 1922-23 under snowload; rebuilt 1923?.

Tents - 1921 - used as rooms for guests and employees during overflow season - five in use.

Mountain House - n. d. [1878] - used as cafeteria and hotel - two-story frame bldg. with annex shed, siding and shake walls - first hotel at Glacier Point; remodelled in 1921 with annex shed built - since erection of new hotel and up to 1921, used for rooming employees on 2d floor - 1st floor used for storage rooms and soda fountain with lunch counter - normal capacity of thirty-two guests.

Old Barn - n. d. - used as barn and storage room - 1-1/2-story log frame bldg. with log walls - barnyard closed in in 1921 with shaked fence walls.

Gas and Oil House - 1917 - used for gas and oil storage - one-story portable section frame bldg.

Pumphouse - 1923 - one-story frame bldg. with shake walls.

Water Tanks - 1921 - two-inch redwood plank walls on timber platforms - each holds 10,000 gallons - three of this type tank for storage for hotel use - water supplied from upper main reservoir by pipeline.

Upper Main Reservoir - n. d. - built-up earth dam about four feet high on east side - reservoir is natural sloping meadow toward east, at which end is dammed up with four-foot-high earthen dam - water comes from little springs - dam made wider and higher with dragging of reservoir in 1922.

New Horse Corral - 1923 - log post and railing fence.

New Barn - 1923 - used as barn and stable - one-story frame bldg. with shake walls and roof - six single stalls.

Hetch Hetchy Lodge:

Lodge - 1920 - used as main administration bldg. - 1-1/2-story frame bldg., b/b walls, shake roof - up to end of 1922 season operated on American Plan - in 1923 kitchen rebuilt and changed to cafeteria style.

Bathhouse - 1920 - used as bath, lavatory, and toilet for guests - one-story frame bldg., b/b walls, shake roof.

Pumphouse - 1920 - used as water tank tower house and gas and oil station - one-story frame bldg., tower, redwood tank - water pumped from City of San Francisco railroad water station just outside lodge.

Wood Cabins - 1920 - used as guest rooms - one-story frame bldg., b/b walls, shake roof - fourteen of this type with two single beds each - normal capacity of twenty-eight guests.

City Cabins - 1923 - used as guest dormitory - one-story frame bldg., b/b walls, roofing paper - eight of this type cabin, built by City of San Francisco in 1923 to accommodate weekend excursion parties.

Washroom - 1923 - used as men’s washroom - one-story frame bldg., b/b walls, roofing paper - built by City of San Francisco in 1923 in connection with their cabins for weekend excursion guests.

City Cabins - 1923 - used as guest dormitory - one-story frame bldg., b/b walls, roofing paper - two of this type bldg. in use.

Warehouse - n. d. - used for storage of Yosemite National Park Co. boat - located at Hetchy Hetchy Dam and owned by City of San Francisco.

Big Trees Lodge:

Kitchen - 1920 - used as kitchen and pantry - one-story frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof.

Women’s Lavatory - 1920 - used as lavatory and toilet for women - one-story frame bldg. with rustic log walls and shake roof.

Canvas Cabin - 1920 - used as guest rooms - one-story frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof - three of this type in use.

Redwood Cabin - 1920 - used as guest rooms - one-story frame bldg. with resawed siding - fourteen of this type in use.

Tent - 1923 - used as rooms for employees and for guests during overflow - one-story frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof - two of this type in use.

Proposed Tree Cabins - permission being asked from Department of the Interior to build hollow trees out with glass walls and equip as bedrooms.

Big Trees Lodge - 1920 - used as administration building - one-story frame bldg. with rustic log walls and shake roof - roof broken in snow, winter of 1920-21 - season of 1922 canvas used for temporary roof covering - roof rebuilt in 1923 - up to end of season of 1921, operated on American Plan only; since 1922 operated cafeteria style.

Water Tank - 1923 - used as water supply tank - one-story frame bldg. - two-inch redwood planks on tank - built 1923 for new water supply system for lodge.

Well - 1923 - two-inch plank walls - water carried from here through pipeline to water tank.

Tuolumne Meadows Lodge:

Canvas Cabins - n. d. [1916?] - used as guest rooms - one-story frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof - fifty of this type cabin with new canvas put in 1923 - normal capacity of 100 guests.

Lodge - n. d. [1916?] - used as main administration bldg. - one-story frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof - built by Desmond Park Service Co. in 1916 and operated on American Plan - later shut down - reopened 1922 by Yosemite National Park Co. and operated on cafeteria style - changed to American Plan 1923.

Dormitory - 1916 - used as dormitory for men and women employees; during overflow in season, is also used for housing guests - one-story portable section frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof - four of this type in use.

Women’s Bathhouse - 1916 - used as bath, laundry, and boilerhouse - one-story portable section frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof - two of this type, for men and women.

Women’s Toilet Building - 1916 - used as women’s toilet - one-story portable section frame bldg.

Men’s Toilet Building - 1916 - used as men’s toilet - two portable section one-story frame bldgs. put together.

Icehouse - 1916 - used as cold storage rooms - one-story log frame bldg. with log walls and shake roof - icehouse filled every spring with ice to last during summer season.

Barn - 1916 - used as warehouse - one-story frame bldg. with shake walls and roof.

Water Tank - n. d. - used as water supply tank - redwood - water comes through pipeline from Tuolumne River.

Hikers’ Camp at Tuolumne Meadows:

Men’s Dormitory - 1923 - used as dormitory for hikers - one-story portable section frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof - two of this type, for men and women - erected in 1923 for convenience of hikers who could secure lodging and meals for 75 cents each.

Dining Room - 1923 - used as dining room and kitchen - one-story portable section frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof. [Note that this inventory does not mention a stone lodge building nor does the later description of the lodge at Merced Lake. The stone structures may have been added in the later 1920s.]

General Store at Tuolumne Meadows, Near Soda Springs:

Store - 1916 - used as general store - one-story portable section frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof.

Girls’ Camp at Tenaya Lake:

Icehouse - 1916 - used as storeroom - one-story frame bldg. with log walls and shake roof - originally used as cold storage rooms in conjunction with operation of lodge here up to end of 1921 season - lodge was in connection with High Sierra loop.

Barn - 1916 - used as warehouse - one-story frame bldg. with shake walls and roof.

Water Tank Tower - 1916 - one-story frame structure, open framed log walls, and no roof - water tank removed to Tuolumne Meadows Lodge.

Boathouse - 1916 - log frame structure. Hikers’ Camp at Tenaya Lake:

Dining Room - 1923 - used as dining room and kitchen - one-story portable section frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof.

Men’s Dormitory - 1923 - used as hikers’ dormitory - one-story portable section frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof - two of this type bldg., for men and women.

Boys’ Camp at Merced Lake:

Lodge - 1916 - used as main administration bldg. - one-story frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof - camp was originally used for tourists up to end of 1921 [1918?] season - since 1922 operated as boys’ camp exclusively; enlarged 1922.

Canvas Cabin - 192? - used as rooms - one-story portable frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof - twenty-five of this type in use - in connection with these cabins are several other ones of various kinds and sizes.

Dormitory - 1916 - used as employees’ dormitory - one-story portable section frame b!dg. with canvas walls and roof - two of this type in use.

Icehouse - 1916 - used as cold storage rooms - one-story frame bldg. with log walls and shake roof - filled every spring with ice to last during summer.

Barn - 1916 - used as warehouse - one-story frame bldg. with shake walls and roof.

Women’s Bathhouse - 1916 - used as bathhouse and laundry bldg. - one-story portable section frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof.

Men’s Bathhouse - 1916 - used as men’s bath, lavatory, and boiler room - one-story portable section frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof.

Tennis Court - 1916 - rope netting.

Toilet Building - 1916 - used as men’s toilet - one-story portable frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof - seven of this kind of toilet bldg. - two have toilets only and are for women.

Water Tank - 1916 - used as water supply tank - redwood planks - water comes through pipeline from Merced River.

Hikers’ Camp Between Merced and Washburn Lake:

Men’s Dormitory - 1923 - used as hikers’ dormitory - log frame on posts with canvas walls and roof - two of them tents, for men and women.

Dining Room - 1923 - used as dining room and kitchen - log frame on posts with canvas walls and roof.

Washing Place - 1923 - for men and women - tin washbowls, mirrors, and paper towels on log - water gotten from Merced River.

Toilet Building - 1923 - portable section frame bldg. with canvas walls and roof - two of this kind, for men and women.

Chinquapin Group:

Gas Filling Station No. 3 - n. d. - oil barrels and filling taps for two underground gas tanks at gas and oil station no. 3.

El Portal Train Shed:

Shelter - 1921 - used as shelter for passengers and cars - one-story frame bldg. with open sides - built by Yosemite National Park Co. - cement driveway on west side of shed built 1923. [Burned 1949]

(Pictures and building numbers of these structures may be found in Yosemite National Park Company photo albums in the Yosemite Research Library and Records Center, Yosemite National Park.)


APPENDIX G
Building Inventory, Yosemite National Park

The following building inventory is divided according to major physical districts of the park. It includes only buildings that are still standing. Breaks in the numerical sequence denote structures that have been removed. All buildings are owned by the National Park Service unless otherwise noted. Certain buildings, marked with an asterisk (*), are considered to have marginal historical or architectural values. Although not of National Register quality, they could be useful in local interpretive or educational efforts or serve adapatively for park management or housing needs. It will be noted that there are some discrepancies in construction dates, though usually they involve differences of only one or two years. This may reflect the time span between actual completion dates and the dates of submission of final construction reports. Structures listed or proposed for listing on the National Register of Historic Places are indicated.


A. Yosemite Valley

1 NR Superintendent’s Residence
U. S. Army (1912),
rem. 1929-30
by Yose Lodge
2-14 NR Residences,
2 - USA (1911), remodeled 1921
3 - NPS (1937)
4 - USA (1911), remodeled 1921 (moved)
5 - USA (1912), remodeled 1921 (moved)
6 - NPS (1920)
7 - NPS (1920), remodeled 1939
8 - NPS (1920), remodeled 1939 (moved)
9 - NPS (1922)
10-12 - NPS (1922)
13 - NPS (1923) (1914; remodeled 1923?)
14 - NPS (1924), remodeled 1939
NPS res. area
16-21 NR Residences
16 - NPS (1923? 1926? possibly
built 1923, remodeled 1926)
(1919? moved and remodeled
1923?)
17 - NPS (1926), remodeled 1932
18 - NPS (1919)
19-20 - NPS (1918)
21 - NPS (1919), altered 1934
NPS res. area
34-37 NR Residences
34 - NPS (1930)
35-36 - NPS (1938) (36 - 1936?)
37 - NPS (1939)
NPS res. area
39-45 NR Residences
39-41 - NPS (1927)
42-43 - NPS (1928)
44-45 - NPS (1929)
NPS res. area
46
47-48
NR
NR
NPS (1930)
Residences
4-unit apartment
NPS res. area
54-55 NR Girls’ Dorms
NPS (1923)
NPS res. area
56
57
NR
NR
Rangers’ Club
funds donated by Mather (1920-21)
Girls’ Club
NPS (1923), remodeled 1939
Yose. Village
NPS res. area
58-59 NR Girls’ Dorms
NPS (1932)
NPS res. area
60
64
NR 4-unit apartment
NPS (1934) 61-63
Nurses’ Quarters
NPS (1934)
NPS res. area
NR
Hospital area
65 Residence
NPS (1939)
Hospital area
66-74 Residences
66-67 - NPS (1940), remodeled
1957 and 1958 - NR
68-69 - NPS (1950)
70 - NPS (1951) - NR
71-74 - NPS (1956)
NPS res. area
75-84 Residences
NPS (1958)
Upper Tecoya
101-105 Residences
101-103 - NPS (1917)
104 - NPS (1923)
105 - NPS (1924)
Cascades
106 A & B Residence - A: res., B: dorm
NPS (1926)
Arch Rock
107-113 * Residences (Ahwahnee Row Houses)
YNPC (1922-24); owned YP&CC
Camp 17
120 * Paint shop (former Ind. Vill. cabin)
NPS (1931)
Utility area
122, 124
127
Cabins
122 - “flunky cabin,”
NPS (1920)
124-127 - NPS (1923)
Utility area
Camp 1
225-269 Tent platforms
225-229 - NPS (1950)
230-250 - NPS (1951)
251-258 - YNP Church (1951)
259-269 - NPS (1951)
Camp 6


(Church camp)
Camp 19
300 NR 2-stall garage
NPS (1929)
Supt.’s res.
301 NR 5-stall garage
NPS (1938)
rear res. #3
302 NR 5-stall garage
NPS (1933)
rear res. #48
303 NR 7-stall garage
NPS (1929)
rear res. #43
304 NR 5-stall garage
NPS (1927)
rear res. #41
305 NR 3-stall garage
NPS (1919)
rear res. #40
306 NR Woodshed
NPS (1919)
rear res. #21
307 NR Woodshed
NPS (1919)
rear res. #19
308 NR 5-stall garage
NPS (1933)
rear res. #45
309 NR 2-stall garage
NPS (1924)
rear res. #12
310 NR 2-stall garage
NPS (1922)
rear res. #12
311 NR 4-stall garage
NPS (1927)
rear res. #11
312 NR Woodshed
NPS (1924)
rear res. #8
313 NR 1 -stall garage
NPS (1924)
rear res. #6
315 NR 3-stall garage
NPS (1920)
Rangers’ Club
333 Garage
NPS (1917)
Cascades, by
res. #101
334 Garage
NPS (1917)
Cascades, by
res. #102
335 Garage
NPS (1917)
Cascades, by
res. #103
336 Rock storage room Cascades, behind
NPS (1917)
Cascades, behind
res. #103
337 Garage and storage
NPS (1923)
Cascades, by
res. #104
338 Garage and storage
NPS (1948)
Cascades, by
res. #105
400 NR-’87 Comfort station
NPS (1934)
Vernal Fall
Bridge
401 Comfort station Happy Isles
NPS (1927)
409-416 Comfort stations
409 - NPS (1923); razed 1972
& replaced with new c.s.
of concrete blocks constructed
by JASU
410 - NPS (1941? 1923?); ditto
411 - NPS (1923); ditto
412-414 - NPS (1924); ditto
416 - NPS (1960)
Camp 14
(Lower Pines)
417-419 Comfort stations
417-418 - NPS (1924); razed 1972
& replaced with new c.s.
of concrete blocks constructed
by JASU
419 - NPS (1960)
Camp 12
(North Pines)
420 Comfort station
JASU (1972)
Camp 12
421-424 Comfort stations
421-422 - NPS (1923)
423-424 - NPS (1924)
Camp 15
(Upper River)
428-432 Comfort stations
428-431 - NPS (1922)
Camp 7
(lower River)
433 Bath trailer
(1971)
Camp 6
434-435 Comfort stations
NPS (1922) (employees)
Camp 6
436 Comfort station
Chas. D. Joslin (1964)
Yosemite Falls
parking area
437 Comfort station
NPS (1923); removed 1977?
Camp 19
440-441 Comfort stations
NPS (1929)
Camp 4
(Sunnyside)
445 Comfort station
R. Hodgson & Sons (1957) -
MISSION 66
Village
by visitor center
450 Comfort station
Malven & Nicklas (1958)
Camp 9
451 Comfort station
Malven & Nicklas (1958)
Camp 9
452 Comfort station
Malven & Nicklas (1958)
Camp 9
453-462 Comfort stations
DeFalco Construction Co. (1968? 1969?)
Camp 11
(Upper Pines)
500 Chlorinator House
NPS (1948)
Vernal Fall
500A Chlorinator House
NPS (1948)
Nevada Fall
501 Pumphouse
NPS (1931)
Spring intake
502 Storage
NPS (1946; moved to present
location 1952; originally constructed
for Chinquapin BRC)
NPS maint. area
503 Sewage pumphouse #4 (#7?)
NPS (1924); rased and replaced
1972 by COAC, Inc.
Camp 12
504 Sewage pumphouse #3
NPS (1922); rased and replaced
1972 by COAC, Inc.
Camp 7
505 Sewage Pumphouse
NPS (1922); rased and replaced
1972 by COAC, Inc.
Yosemite Lodge
506 Substation control house
NPS (1931)
Ahwahnee Hotel
507 Standby electrical plant
NPS (1947)
Lewis Memorial
Hospital
508 Meter house
NPS (1931)
Camp 4
(Camp 8?)
509 NR Transformer house
NPS (1920)
by Rangers’ Club
516 Equipment shed
NPS (1921)
NPS utility area
by corral
517 Storage
constructed by U. S. Navy (1943);
relocated 1946 from U. S. Conv.
Hosp. at Ahwahnee Hotel
NPS utility area
back of #516
518 Equipment shed
NPS (1920)
NPS utility area
519 Equipment shed
NPS (1926)
NPS utility area
520 Storage shed
(1910)
NPS utility area
521 Storage shed
NPS (1918)
NPS utility area
west of sharpening
shed
522 Cement storage
NPS (1928)
NPS utility area
back of sharpening
shed
523 Tool sharpening shed
NPS (1928)
NPS utility area
524 Sign storage
U. S. Navy (1943); relocated
from U. S. Conv. Hosp. 1946
NPS utility area
526 Equipment shed
NPS (1932)
NPS utility area
527 NR-’87 Utility building
NPS (1935)
NPS utility area
529 Warehouse
NPS (1916) - removed? Possibly
now replacement storage (1973) -
barn
NPS utility area
530 Supply warehouse
NPS (1916) - 3 offices added 1974
NPS utility area
531 Gas station
NPS (1943)
NPS utility area
533 Storage (former mess hall)
NPS (1920)
NPS utility area
534 Storage
NPS (1916)
NPS utility area
535 Comfort station
NPS (1924); originally for
storage; converted to c.s. 1958
Utility area,
Camp 1
537 Electric plant
NPS (1939)
NPS utility area
540 Sewage disposal plant
NPS (1930); remodeled 1938;
abandoned 1977
Bridalveil Fall
542 Pumphouse
NPS (1938)
by disposal plant
542A Lime storage by disposal plant
542B Primary digester
NPS (1957)
by disposal plant
544 Pumphouse
NPS (1945)
Road oil mixing plant
545 Screen shelter
NPS (1945)
near dam,
Yosemite power plant
546 NR Powerhouse
NPS (1918)
Cascades
547 Valve shelter
NPS (1940)
by wood stave
pipeline,
power plant
548 Storage
CCC (1940)
near pipeline,
power plant
549 Stave storage
NPS (1940)
Cascades
550 Well Station No. 1
A&W Plumbing (1974)
Yosemite Lodge
551 Standby power building
NPS (n. d.)
Yosemite Lodge
552 Campground office
NPS (n. d.); moved from Wawona,
1961; former building #4093,
storage shed (Baker), South Wawona
Yosemite Valley?
559
560
Sanitation office
(n. d.)
Forestry warehouse
(n. d.)
NPS utility area
NPS utility area
575 NR Administration building
NPS (1924)
Village
576 NR Valley District building
(old museum)
NPS (1925); converted from
museum to offices in 1967,
after completion of visitor center
Village
577 Jail
NPS (1927); converted to rescue
cache & morgue in 1974
NPS utility area
580 NR Chapel
Ca. St. Sunday Sch. Assoc.
(1879) moved and remodeled 1901
Old Village area
583 NR Post office
private contractor (1924);
rented to Post Office
Department; owned by
NPS since 1944
Village
584 Entrance kiosk
NPS (1961); original building #584
constructed 1926; demolished 1961
and reconstructed
Arch Rock
585 North station
NPS (1926); moved to El Portal
open storage area in 1977
Arch Rock
586 South station
NPS (1926)
Arch Rock
587 Piano storage
Owned, constructed by
YNP Church (1950)
Church bowl
588 Piano storage
Owned, constructed
YNP Church (1950
Church bowl
589 Storage
(n. d.)
Church bowl
592 Post office employees’ garage
Owned, constructed by Post
Office Department (1957)
Village
593 Post office duplex
(ca. 1956)
Village
593 (?) Amphitheater
NPS (n. d.)
Lower River
Campground
594 Amphitheater
(NPS (n. d.)
Lower Pines
Campground
597 * Leonard Cabin
(n. d., early 1900s)
Little Yosemite
Valley
598 Visitor center
NPS (1967)
Village
599 Kiosks Campgrounds
599 (?) Reservations office
NPS (1980)
Curry parking area
near orchard
601 Comfort station
NPS (1924); maintained by
YP&CC
Camp 6
602-606 Comfort station
NPS (1924); maintained by
YP&CC; #605 razed & replaced
by YP&CC, (n. d.)
Camp 16
607 Lewis Memorial Hospital
NPS (1929); additions in 1953,
1960-61, 1973-74
Hospital area
608 Isolation ward
NPS (pre-1929, possibly 1926)
Hospital area
609 NR LeConte Memorial Lodge
Sierra Club (1903); dismantled,
moved, and rebuilt (1919)
Across from
Camp 16
610 Pit privy
NPS (1930)
By LeConte Memorial
Lodge
611 Carport and bike port
R. Pederson & Sons (1973)
Behind hospital
625 * Water gauging station
Owned, maintained jointly by USGS,
Water Resources Division & NPS;
const. NPS (1915), destroyed 1975
and replaced with smaller structure
Happy Isles
627 * Water gauging station
Owned, constructed by USGS (1916);
maintained jointly by USGS, DWR,
& NPS
Pohono Bridge
628 * Nature Center (old fish hatchery)
St. Department of Fish & Game
(1927-28); remodeled 1957
Happy Isles
636 NR Residence (teacherage)
Owned, constructed by Mariposa
County Unified School District (1928)
NPS res. area
637 NR Residence (bus driver)
Owned, constructed by Mariposa
County Unified School District (1937)
NPS res. area
638 NR 3-stall garage
Owned, constructed by Mariposa
County Unified School District (1937)
NPS res. area
642 Elementary school
Owned by U. S. Office of Education;
operated by Mariposa County Unified
School District; constructed by
Office of Education (1955)
NPS res. area
643 3-apartment residence (teacherage)
Operated by Mariposa County Unified
School District (1958)
Upper Tecoya
650-652 Residences (Pacific Telephone
& Telegraph)
Owned by PT&T; constructed bt
Berry Construction Co. (1957)
Upper Tecoya
653 Pacific Telephone & Telegraph office
Owned, constructed by PT&T (1956)
NPS utility area
655 Toll terminal building
Owned, constructed by PT&T (1956)
Turtleback Dome
656 Toll repeater building
Owned, constructed by PT&T (1956)
Sentinel Dome
657 Toll station radio building
Owned, constructed by PT&T (1956);
given to NPS
Yosemite Creek
900 NR Ansel Adams Gallery
(old Best’s Studio)
Best’s Studio, Inc. (1925)
Village
902 NR Duplex residence
Best’s Studio, Inc. (1925)
Village
903 NR 3-stall garage and storage
Best’s Studio, Inc. (1925)
Village
904 NR Duplex residence
Best’s Studio, Inc. (1925)
Village
918 Degnan dormitory (Lost Arrow dorm)
Degnan-Donohoe (1949)
Village
919 Comfort station - removed? Old Village
1001 Residence
Owned by YP&CC, constructed by
Phillsbury’s (1925), four portable
cabins joined together and sealed [Editor’s note: the correct spelling is Pillsbury—dea]
Village
1002 Residence
Owned by YP&CC, constructed by
Phillsbury’s (1925), three portable
cabins
Village
1003 Residence
Owned by YP&CC, constructed by
Phillsbury’s (1925)
Village
1005 NR Yosemite Art Activity Center
(Pohono Studio)
Constructed by Boysen (1925)
Village

B. El Portal

700 * Residence
Bariod Division, National Lead Co.
(1929)
Yosemite Research
Center
701 * 1-stall garage
National Lead Co. (1929 or
early 1930s)
Yosemite Research
Center by res. #700
702 * Laboratory (former ranger office)
National Lead Co. (1929 or
early 1930s)
Yosemite Research
Center near res. #700
703-705 * Residences
National Lead Co. (1929)
NPS res. area
Rancheria Flat
707 Laundry and c.s
NPS (1960)
Trailer village
711,
713-717,
719-721,
723,
726-728,
730-734,
737-738
Residences
NPS (1960-61)
NPS res. area
Rancheria Flat
756 Sewage disposal plant
NPS (1961)
Maintenance area
near res. area
757 Chlorinator house
NPS (1961)
Maintenance area
near res. area
758 Water pumphouse
(n. d.); remodeled by NPS (1959)
Maintenance area
759 1-stall fire truck garage
Constructed by citizens of
El Portal (1960)
Commercial area
760 Repair garage
El Portal Mining Co. (1949);
modified as maintenance shop,
NPS (1978)
Commercial area
761 * Grocery store and residence
YVRR Co. (1934); purchased by
NPS, 1958
Commercial area
762 * Hotel
YVRR Co. (1932); purchased by
NPS, 1958
Commercial area
763 2-stall garage
El Portal Mining Co.? (1952);
purchased by NPS, 1958
Commercial area
by hotel
764 Restaurant and bar
El Portal Mining Co.? (1948);
purchased by NPS, 1958
Commercial area
765-776 Motel cabins
765-769, 775-776 - (1948)
771-774 - (1950)
770 - (1955)
El Portal Mining Co.; purchased 1958
Commercial area
777 Storage
(n. d.)
Commercial area
778
779
NR Transportation exhibit shelter
NPS (1964)
Bagby water tanks
YVRR (1907)
Commercial area
Commercial area
779A NR Bagby stationhouse
YVRR (1907)
Commercial area
780 Incinerator
NPS (1962); converted to
transfer station, 1973
Maintenance area
781 Incinerator office
NPS (1962); converted to
transfer office, 1973
Maintenance area
by incinerator
782 Storage
NPS (1962); converted to
transfer storage, 1973
Maintenance area
by incinerator
783 Pumphouse
NPS (1975); wastewater treatment
plant, 1977
Maintenance area
784 Carroll Clark Community Hall
former VFW community building;
taken over by NPS, 1980
Commercial area
786 Fire (Chevron) dorm
(n. d.); taken over from
YP&CC, 1981
Commercial area
791 NR Turntable
YVRR (1907)
Commercial area

C. Mather

2000 * Ranger station/residence
NPS, PWA (1934)
Mather
2002 4-stall garage
NPS, CCC (1935)
By ranger station
2003 Pumphouse
NPS (1936)
By ranger station
2004 Barn
NPS, CCC (1940)
Behind ranger station
2005 Storage (old cookhouse and quarters)
NPS, CCC (1935)
Mather
2006 Bunkhouse
NPS (1927?); former Aspen Valley
ranger station; moved to Mather 1964
Mather
2014-2015 Tent platforms
NPS (1959)
Mather ranger
station
2100 * Mess hall & dorm (duplex)
City of San Francisco (1935)
Hetch Hetchy, north
building of 2, south
side Quarry Road
2101 * Ranger station (duplex)
City of San Francisco (1935);
former Guest Cottage
Hetch Hetchy,
south of building of 2
2103 Sewage pumphouse
NPS (1934)
Hetch Hetchy,
across from comfort
station
2104 NR-’87 Comfort station, public
NPS, CCC (1934)
Hetch Hetchy
2200 * Guard station
NPS (1934)
Miguel Meadow
2201 Barn
NPS (1934)
The building currently used as a barn
at Miguel Meadows is actually a cabin
built by Miguel Errera about 1890.
This is possibly the last building still
in use from the cattle and sheep raising
period in the high country. The cabin
was converted to a barn in the late 1950s.
The location of the 1934 structure is
unclear.
Miguel Meadow
2202 Woodshed
NPS, CCC (1935)
Miguel Meadow
by #2200
2204 Storage building
NPS, CCC (1935)
Miguel Meadow
(east)
no # Storage building
San Francisco PUC (1958),
owned by City of San Francisco
Lake Eleanor Road -
Gravel Pit Lake Road
2206 Fire lookout
Owned, constructed by USFS
and NPS (1963)
North Mountain
2207 Pit toilet
Owned, constructed by USFS
and NPS (1963)
North Mountain
by fire lookout
2208 Utility Building
Owned, constructed by USFS
and NPS (1963)
North Mountain
by fire lookout
2300 NR-’87 NPS, CCC (1936) Frog Creek cabin Frog Creek near
Lake Eleanor
2400 Packer shack
City of San Francisco (1921);
removed 1970; number of existing
structure unknown
Lake Eleanor Road -
Jack Main Canyon
Trail
2450 NR-’87 Patrol cabin
City of San Francisco (1945)
Vernon Lake
no # NR-’87 Patrol cabin
State of California DWR (1947)
Sachse Springs

D. Tuolumne Meadows

658 Toll station radio building
Pacific Telephone & Telegraph (1956);
given to NPS
Tuolumne Meadows
3000 NR Ranger station
NPS (1924)
Tuolumne Meadows
on road to lodge
3001 Naturalist’s cabin
NPS (1922) near
Tuolumne Meadows
ranger station
3002 Patrol cabin
NPS (1922)
Tuolumne Meadows
3003 Barn
NPS (1924)
Tuolumne Meadows
3004 Saddle room
NPS (1930)
Tuolumne Meadows
3005 NR Contact station
NPS, CCC (1936)
Tuolumne Meadows
on road near store
3010 NR Mountaineering shop (former mess hall)
NPS, CCC (1934) (visitor center
function relocated here in 1980)
Tuolumne Meadows
utility area
3011 NR Cabin
NPS (1934)
Tuolumne Meadows
3012 NR Cabin
NPS (1934)
Tuolumne Meadows
by #3011
3013 NR Cabin
NPS (1934)
Tuolumne Meadows
by #3012
3014 NR Cabin
NPS (1934)
Tuolumne Meadows
by #3013
3015 NR Shower and toilet
NPS (1934)
Tuolumne Meadows
by #3014
3016 Gas and oil shelter
NPS (1934); rebuilt 1950
Tuolumne Meadows
3017 Quarters (original sewage pumphouse)
NPS (1939); remodeled to seasonal
residence 1975
Tuolumne Meadows
utility area
3018 Storage shed
NPS (1939)
Tuolumne Meadows
utility area
3019 Washroom
NPS (1934)
Tuolumne Meadows
utility area
3020 Comfort station
NPS (1926)
Tuolumne Meadows
near ranger station
3021 NR Comfort station
NPS (1934)
East end of
campground
3022 NR Comfort station
NPS (1934) of
3d from east end
campground
3023 NR Comfort station
NPS (1934)
5th from east end
of campground
3024 NR Comfort station
NPS (1931)
7th from east end
of campground
3028 Gas pump station
NPS (1950); rebuilt 1986
Tuolumne Meadows
near barn
3029-3041 Pit privies
NPS (1930-53)
Tuolumne Meadows
campground
3042-3047 Tent platforms
3042-44 - NPS (1971)
3045-47 - NPS (1971)
Tuolumne Meadows
near ranger station
3048 Tent platform - Church
YNP Church (1946)
Tuolumne Meadows
church camp
3052-3053 Tent platforms Tuolumne Meadows
camp
3054-3067 Tent platforms
NPS (1971)
Tuolumne Meadows
utility area
3070-3075 Tent platforms
NPS (1930-40)
Tuolumne Meadows
utility area
3076 Comfort station
NPS (1960)
Tuolumne Meadows
campground
2d from east end
3077 Comfort station
NPS (1960)
Tuolumne Meadows
campground
4th from east end
3078 Comfort station
NPS (1960)
Tuolumne Meadows
campground
6th from east end
3079 Comfort station
NPS (1960)
Tuolumne Meadows
campground
3080 Comfort station
NPS (1972)
Near YP&CC
stables
3081 (?) Sewage disposal plant
(n. d.) - removed?
Tuolumne Meadows
3081 NR Parsons Memorial Lodge
Sierra Club (1915)
Tuolumne Meadows
3082 (?) Bathhouse
(n. d.) - removed?
Tuolumne Meadows
3082 NR McCauley cabin
John McCauley (1902)
Tuolumne Meadows
no # Bathhouse
NPS (1964)
Tuolumne Meadows
seasonal housing area
3112-3114 Comfort station
Edgar A. Girard (1964)
Tenaya Lake
campground
3200 NR Ranger station
NPS (1931)
Tioga Pass
3201 Checking kiosk
NPS (1940?) - does not resemble
present structure (ca. 1961?)
Tioga Pass
3203 NR Comfort station
NPS, CCC (1934)
Tioga Pass
3400 NR-’87 Ranger station/patrol cabin
State of California & NPS (1927)
Merced Lake
3450 NR-’87 Snow Creek cabin
Curry & Tressider (1929)
Tenaya Zig Zag
Trail near Snow
Creek
3501 NR-’87 Snow survey cabin
St. DWR (1947)
Snow Flat

E. Wawona

654 Yosemite Essex building
Pacific Telephone & Telegraph (1956)
Wawona
4000 NR-’87 Ranger station/residence
NPS, PWA (1934)
Chilnualna Road
4001 NR-’87 Ranger residence
NPS, CCC (1938)
Chilnualna Road
4002 Ranger office (old Alder Creek
fee collection cabin); NPS (1924);
moved to area of #4000 ca. 1934
and then to behind #4027 in 1970
Mike Adams’s office,
1971
4003 * Residence (original CCC mess hall)
NPS, CCC (1936); remodeled
1940, 1953
On hill
4004 Dormitory
(n. d.)
Maintenance area
4008 * Teacherage & school
NPS, CCC (1937)
Wawona
4020 * BRC repair garage
(old firehouse & office)
NPS, CCC (1934)
Maintenance area
(old CCC camp)
4023 * 4-stall garage (snow plow shed)
NPS, CCC (1934)
Maintenance area
(old CCC camp)
4025 * 7-stall garage & light plant
NPS, CCC (1934)
Maintenance area
(old CCC camp)
4027 * Office (old ECW office; now Wawona
district ranger headquarters)
NPS, CCC (1934)
Maintenance area
(old CCC camp)
4031 Quonset storage
CCC (1934)
Maintenance area
(old CCC camp)
4038 Residence - Abston
(1947) - purchased by NPS in 1972
Wawona
4039 Tent platform - single Behind #4002
4040 Tent platform - single Behind #4003
4041 Tent platform Maintenance area
(barn)
4042 Residence - Carter & Reed
(1968)
Wawona
4043 Residence - Larke Assoc.
(1949)
Wawona
4044 Saddle room
NPS (1947); originally constructed
as light plant shelter (#4602) at
South Entrance ranger duplex;
moved to Wawona dn converted
to saddle room in 1953
Wawona
(near barn)
4045 Residence - Mee
(1946)
Section 35
4046 Residence - Mansfield
(1955)
Section 35
4047 Residence - Walker
(n. d.)
Section 35
4048 Residence (storage) - Fancher
or Sierra Club? (n. d.)
Section 35
4049 Residence - Whitman
(n. d.)
Section 35
4050 2-stall garage
NPS, CCC (1935)
Behind #4000
4052 Equipment shed
NPS, CCC (1934)
On hill across
from #4003
4053 Gas and oil shelter
NPS (1949); moved to utility
area in 1973
Utility area
by #4052
4054 Storage shed
NPS, CCC (1934)
Utility area
on hill
4055 Incinerator
NPS (1934)
On hill
4056 Barn
NPS (1941)
Utility area
near #4003
4057 Woodshed & 2-stall garage
NPS (1938)
Schoolhouse
4058 Sewage pumphouse
NPS (1934)
Big Creek
4060 Woodshed
NPS (1940)
Behind #4003
4061 Comfort station
NPS (1951) (1953?)
Wawona campground
4062 Comfort station
NPS (1951)
Wawona campground
Cunningham Flat
4063 Comfort station
NPS (1951)
Wawona campground
Interm. section
4064 Comfort station
NPS (1952)
Camp A. E. Wood
4065 Residence (office) - Tomik
(1955)
Section 35
4066 Comfort station
NPS (1953)
Camp A. E. Wood
4067 Comfort station
NPS (1958) center
Camp A. E. Wood
4068 Chlorinator house
NPS (1959)
End of Forest Drive
4069 3-stall garage & storage
NPS (1963)
Rear of residence
#4001
4070 Residence - Gorr
(ca. 1949)
Section 35
4073 Residence - Greening
(ca. 1950)
Section 35
4074 Residence - Anderson
(ca. 1960)
Section 35
4075 Residence - Teunis
(ca. 1950)
Section 35
4076 Residence - Teunis
(ca. 1950)
Section 35
4077 Residence - Culver
(ca. 1960)
Section 35
4078 Residence - Hart
(ca. 1955)
Section 35
4079 (?) Tent platform
(n. d)
Utility area
4079 Residence Baublitz
Baublitz (ca. mid-1950s)
Wawona
Redwoods #21
4080 Pumphouse
W. F. Whitman? (1963)
Section 35
rear of #4049
4081 Storage shed
Whitman? (n. d.)
Section 35
rear of #4049
4082 1-stall garage
Whitman? (n. d.)
Section 35
rear of #4049
4083 Water tank building
Whitman? (n. d.)
Section 35
rear of #4049
4084 Residence - Cushman
(ca. 1950?)
South Wawona
4085 1-stall garage
(n. d.)
South Wawona
rear of #4084
4086 Pumphouse
Cushman (1963)
South Wawona
rear of #4084
4087 Residence - Thompson Parson
(n. d.)
South Wawona
4088 Garage
(n. d.)
South Wawona
by #4087
4089 Pumphouse - Mansfield
NPS (1963)
Service for
#4046
4090 Pumphouse - Walker
NPS (1963)
Service for
#4047
4091 Pumphouse - Francher
NPS (1963)
Service for
#4048
4092 Residence - Baker
(n. d.)
Wawona
4093 Storage shed
(n. d.)
Wawona
4094 Residence - Hickok
(ca. 1955)
Section 35
4095 Residence - Fleming
(ca. 1965)
Section 35
4096 Residence - Byers
(ca. 1965)
Section 35
4097 Residence - Byers
(ca. 1965)
Section 35
4098 Residence - Byers
(ca. 1970)
Section 35
4099 Bathhouse
NPS (1964)
Wawona
4100 * Wawona wagon shop (gray barn)
Wawona Hotel Co. (1920);
restored by NPS in 1959
PYHC
4101 NR Hodgdon homestead cabin
J. Hodgdon (1879); moved from
Aspen Valley to Wawona in 1959
PYHC
4102 NR Wells Fargo office (Yosemite
Transportation Co. Office)
YVRR (1910); moved from
Yosemite Valley in 1959
PYHC
4103 Wells Fargo utility building
(1910? 1912?); moved 1960-
PYHC
4104 NR Army cabin (acting superintendent)
USA (1904); moved from Yosemite
Valley in 1960
PYHC
4105 Army tack room
USA (1917); moved from Yosemite
Valley in 1960
PYHC
4106 Crane Flat ranger cabin
USA (1915); moved 1959
PYHC
4107 Cuneo cabin
Thomas Hope (1933); moved from
Cuneo Ranch, 1960
PYHC
4108 Pit toilet
NPS (1952); moved from Yosemite
Valley in 1960
PYHC
4109 Pit toilet
NPS (1952); moved from Yosemite
Valley in 1960
PYHC
4110 Anderson cabin
George Anderson (1876); moved
from Foresta in 1961
PYHC
4111 Jail (former powder cache and morgue)
Jim Degnan? (1880?)
PYHC
4112 NR Artist’s cabin (Jorgensen studio)
(former #50 - employee residence)
Jorgensen (1900); remodeled 1934
PYHC
4113 Wagon shelter
NPS (1962)
PYHC
4114 Blacksmith shop
(n. d.); moved from Madera in 1963
PYHC
4115-4129 Tent frames
NPS (n. d.)
?
4130-4131 Tent frames
NPS (n. d.)
?
4131 Wagon shop (former Chinese laundry
and plumbing shop)
Wawona Hotel Co. (1917)
PYHC
4135 Former Hungry Bear restaurant
Bliss (ca. 1975)
Section 35
4145 Residence - Kuntz
(n. d.)
Section 35
4146 Residence - Pattimore
(ca. 1960)
Section 35
4147 Residence - Bruce
(ca. 1955))
Section 35
4148 Residence - Fowler
(1967)
Section 35
4149 Residence - Fowler
(1970)
Section 35
4151 Residence - Krahenbuhl
(ca. 1968); owner’s residence
added on to guest cabin dating
from 1942
Section 35
4152 Duplex - May
(ca. 1963)
Section 35
4153 Residence - May
(ca. 1964)
Section 35
4154 Residence - Doane
(ca. 1950)
Section 35
4166 Residence - Carhart
(n. d.)
Section 35
4170 Residence - Comfort
(n. d.)
Section 35
4175 Residence - Bliss
(n. d.)
Section 35
4401 Equipment storage (slaughterhouse)
Wawona Hotel Co. (1929)
Wawona Hotel
4414 NR Soda & curio store (former Hill
Studio - Pavilion)
Wawona Hotel Co.? (1886);
remodeled 1968
Wawona Hotel
4416 NR Sequoia Hotel
Wawona Hotel Co. (1917)
Wawona Hotel
4417 NR Wawona Hotel
Wawona Hotel Co., Washburn
brothers (1879)
Wawona Hotel
4418 NR Little Brown Building
(Moore Cottage)
Wawona Hotel Co. (pre-1894)
Wawona Hotel
4419 NR Long Brown Building (Washburn
Cottage)
Wawona Hotel Co. (ca. 1899)
Wawona Hotel
4420 NR Long White Building (Clark Cottage)
Washburn brothers (1876)
Wawona Hotel
4421 NR Little White Cottage (Manager’s
Residence)
Wawona Hotel Co. (1884)
Wawona Hotel
4422 NR Annex
Wawona Hotel Co. (1917)
Wawona Hotel
4423 Barn
NPS (1932); constructed for Wawona
Hotel Co. prior to acquisition of
Wawona property in exchange for
right-of-way for Highway 41 through
then existing barn
PYHC
4433 Shed
Wawona Hotel Co. (1928?)
Wawona Hotel
4436 Service station
(1955)
Wawona Hotel
4437 Store and gift shop
(n. d.)
Wawona Hotel
4439 Cabin - Kissler
Kessler? (n. d.)
Section 35
4440 Cabin
Kessler? (n. d.)
Section 35
4441 Cabin - Kissler
Kessler? (n. d.)
Section 35
4442 Cabin
Kessler? (n. d.)
Section 35
4443 a & b Duplex
Kessler? (n. d.)
Section 35
4444 Service building
Kessler? (n. d.)
Section 35
4445 Pumphouse
Kessler? (n. d.)
Section 35
4446 Residence
Kessler? (n. d.)
Section 35
4447 Cabin
Kessler? (n. d.)
Section 35
4448 Linen roome
Kessler? (n. d.)
Section 35
4449 Cabin
Kessler? (n. d.)
Section 35
4450 Garage
Kessler? (n. d.)
Section 35
4451 Cabin
Kessler? (n. d.)
Section 35
4452 Cabin
Kessler? (n. d.)
Section 35
4453 Cabin
Kessler? (n. d.)
Section 35
Federally owned properties in Section 35 Retained under Reservation of Use and Occupancy as of January 1980:
no #s Residence - Hawkes
(1973)
Section 35
Residence - Morgan
(1968)
Section 35
Residence - Ketchum
(ca. 1965)
Section 35
Residence - Romero
(n. d.); also garage, shop building,
storage building, 3 mobile homes
Section 35
Residence - Oliver
(n. d.)
Section 35
Residence - Romero
(n. d.)
Section 35
Residence - Bliss
(ca. 1968)
Section 35
Residence - Edelstein
(ca. 1965)
Section 35
Residence - Hodgkinson
(ca. 1960)
Section 35
Residence - Curnow
(ca. 1965)
Section 35
Residence - Nishkian
(ca. 1950)
Section 35
Residence - Fahlen
(ca. 1950)
Section 35
Residence - Hunter
(ca. 1965)
Section 35
Residence - Paltenghi
(ca. 1968)
Section 35
Main building - Moore duplex
(ca. 1965), residence, restroom
building, pumphouse, garage,
residence & laundry building
Section 35
Residence - Moore
(ca. 1950); plus shop & storage
building, hardware & office building,
two lumber storage buildings
Section 35
Residence - Berry
(1945)
Section 35
Residence - Brown
(1973)
Section 35
Residence - Dalbey
(1964)
Section 35
Residence - Davis
(ca. 1955)
Section 35
Residence - Cate
(ca. 1950)
Section 35
Residence - Conn
(ca. 1959)
Section 35
Residence - Hunt
(ca. 1965)
Section 35
Residence - Cardella
(1961)
Section 35
Residence - Hunter
(ca. 1962)
Section 35
Residence - McNamara
(ca. 1960)
Section 35
Residence - Coleston
(1973)
Section 35
Residence - Moon
(ca. 1960)
Section 35
Residence - Williamson
(ca. 1960)
Section 35
Residence - Savage
(ca. 1955); plus guest house
Section 35
Residence - Marks
(ca. 1958)
Section 35
Residence - Wiley
(ca. 1966)
Section 35
Residence - Johnson
(ca. 1970)
Section 35
Residence - James
(ca. 1943)
Section 35
Residence - Love
(ca. 1965)
Section 35
Residence - Crews
(ca. 1968)
Section 35
Residence - Kline
(ca. 1965)
Section 35
Residence - Wright
(ca. 1970)
Section 35
Residence - Walling
(ca. 1970)
Section 35
Residence - Nachtigal
(ca. 1955)
Section 35
Residence - Putnam
(ca. 1965)
Section 35
Residence - Stenzel
(ca. 1970)
Section 35
Residence - Simmons
(ca. 1965)
Section 35
Residence - Vincent
(ca. 1972)
Section 35
Residence - Livingston
(1973)
Section 35
Residence - Darnall
(ca. 1975)
Section 35
Residence - Bray
(ca. 1970)
Section 35
Residence - Jobe
(ca. 1960)
Section 35
Residence - Hixson
(ca. 1964)
Section 35
Residence - Bickston
(ca. 1970)
Section 35
Residence - Boyer
(ca. 1960)
Section 35
Residence - Imbler
(ca. 1960)
Section 35
Residence - Maxwell
(ca. 1965)
Section 35
Residence - Eaton
(ca. 1969)
Section 35
Residence - Ottonello
(ca. 1970); plus swimming pool
Section 35
Residence - Novak
(ca. 1965)
Section 35
Residence - Madden
(ca. 1965)
Section 35
Residence - Stultz
(ca. 1960)
Section 35
Residence - Minch
(ca. 1960)
Section 35
Residence - Sanders
(ca. 1955)
Section 35
Residence - Zipser
(ca. 1974)
Section 35
Residence - Kaiser
(ca. 1968)
Section 35
Residence - Cornell
(ca. 1970)
Section 35
Residence - Dull
(ca. 1972)
Section 35
Residence - Soulanille
(ca. 1972)
Section 35
Residence - Trimmer
(ca. 1974)
Section 35
Residence - Williamson
(ca. 1968); plus guest house
Section 35
Residence - Landsnaes
(ca. 1972)
Section 35
Residence - Comfort
(ca. 1930)
Section 35
Residence - James
(ca. 1960)
Section 35
Residence - Blanchard
(1969)
Section 35
Residence - McCray
(1964)
Section 35
Residence - Olmstead
(1971)
Section 35
Residence - McKinsey
(1975)
Section 35
Residence - Flowers
(1974)
Section 35
Residence - Flowers
(ca. 1970)
Section 35
Residence - Stockton
(ca. 1945); plus guest house
Section 35
Residence - Nagy
(ca. 1971)
Section 35
Residence - Downey
(ca. 1968)
Residence - Swineford
(ca. 1970)
Section 35
Section 35
4600 NR-’87 Ranger residence - duplex
NPS, PWA (1934)
South Entrance
4601 3-stall garage
NPS, CCC (1935)
South Entrance
behind #4600
4604 NR-’87 Office (former checking kiosk)
NPS, PWA (1934)
South Entrance
4605 Checking kiosk
NPS (ca. 1958)
South Entrance
4606 NR-’87 Comfort station
NPS, PWA (1934)
South Entrance
4607 A-V shelter
(n. d.)
South Entrance
4702 Comfort station
(1978?)
Mariposa Grove
tram parking area
4725 NR Museum (Galen Clark cabin)
NPS (1930)
Mariposa Grove
4726 NR-’87 Comfort station
NPS, PWA (1931)
Mariposa Grove
4737-4741 Tent platforms
NPS (1940); moved to Wawona, n. d.
Mariposa Grove
4800 NR-’87 Ranger patrol cabin
State of California & NPS (1931)
Buck Camp
4801 Saddle room
State of California & NPS (1931)
Buck Camp
4820 Insect control lab (former mess hall)
NPS (1935)
Eight Mile

F. Chinquapin to Glacier Point

5000 NR-’87 Ranger station
NPS, PWA (1934)
Chinquapin
5001 4-stall garage
NPS (1935)
Chinquapin
behind #5000
5003 Gas pump shelter
NPS (1934)
Chinquapin
north of #5000
5004 Comfort station
NPS, PWA (1933)
Chinquapin
east of #5000
5005 Barn
NPS (1924)
Chinquapin
west of #5000
5050 Gas station and lunch room
YP&CC (1933)
Chinquapin
5051 Light plant
YP&CC (1933)
Chinquapin
5100 Ranger station
NPS (1939)
Badger Pass ski
area
5102 Storage shed
NPS (1971)
Badger Pass
5103 First Aid building
(n. d.); moved from Foresta in 1969
Badger Pass
ski area
5104 Garbage can storage
(n. d.)
Badger Pass
5110 NR-’87 Ostrander Lake ski hut
NPS, CCC (1940)
Ostrander Lake
5150 Ski lodge
YP&CC (1935)
Badger Pass
5151 Ski lift power house
YP&CC (1935)
Badger Pass
5200 Ranger station
NPS (1931)
Glacier Point
5201 Naturalist’s cabin
NPS (1931)
Glacier Point
5202-5204 Tent platforms - double
NPS (1950)
Glacier Point
campground
5205 Bathhouse
(n. d.)
Glacier Point
5210 Comfort station
NPS, PWA (1934); converted
to residence
Glacier Point
5212 NR Naturalist’s Lookout
NPS (1925)
Glacier Point
5300 NR-’87 Fire lookout
NPS (1934)
Henness Ridge
5312-5313 Tent platform - double
NPS (1958)
Henness Ridge
5314 Cabin
(1958?)
Henness Ridge
5315 Comfort station
NPS (1958)
Henness Ridge
east end
5316 Comfort station
(1958?)
Henness Ridge
2d from east
5317 Comfort station
(1958?)
Henness Ridge
3d from east
5318 Comfort station
(1958?)
Henness Ridge
4th from east
5319 Bathhouse
NPS (1958)
Bridalveil campground
5321 NR McGurk Cabin
McGurk (1895-97)
McGurk Meadow

G. Foresta

5400 Residence - Hummer
(n. d.)
Foresta
5401 Residence - Gunderson
(n. d.)
Foresta
5403 Employee residence - Haglund
(n. d.)
Foresta
5405 Residence - Guy
(1956)
Foresta
5406 Residence - Tate
(n. d.)
Foresta
5407 Barn (small)
(n. d.)
Big Meadow/
Foresta
5408 Barn (large)
(n. d.)
Big Meadow/
Foresta
5410 Guest house - Butler
(n. d.)
Foresta

H. Crane Flat to Hodgdon

6000 Ranger station
NPS (1940)
Crane Flat
6007 Generator shed
NPS (1940)
Crane Flat
6008
6010
Storage building
NPS (1940)
4-stall garage
NPS (1940)
Crane Flat
Crane Flat
6012 Light plant
NPS (1940)
Crane Flat
6013 * BRC storage
NPS, CCC (1934); converted to
bathhouse by YI, 1970s
Crane Flat BRC
6014 * BRC camp mess hall
NPS (1946); remodeled 1951
Crane Flat BRC
6015 * BRC camp barracks
NPS (1946); remodeled 1952, used
as dorm by YI
Crane Flat BRC
6016 * BRC camp barracks and office
NPS (1946); remodeled 1984,
used as dorm by YI
Crane Flat BRC
6017 * Oil house & light plant
NPS (1934); remodeled 1980s,
used as classroom by YI
Crane Flat BRC
camp (YI)
6018 * BRC camp office
(former shower house)
NPS (1946)
Crane Flat BRC
camp (YI)
6020 * BRC camp cook’s quarters
(?); converted to staff cabin by YI
Crane Flat BRC
camp (YI)
6024 * BRC shower Crane Flat BRC
camp (YI)
6025
6027-6029
Barracks, portable plywood
Victory huts
Crane Flat BRC
camp
Crane Flat BRC
camp
6030-6034 Tent platforms
NPS (1950)
Crane Flat
6038 Ranger station
Edgar A. Girard (1964)
Crane Flat campground
6039 Comfort station
Edgar A. Girard (1964)
Crane Flat campground
between loops A & B
6040 Comfort station
Edgar A. Girard (1964)
Crane Flat campground
between loops B & C
6041 Comfort station
Edgar A. Girard (1964)
Crane Flat campground
west end loop D
6042 Comfort station
Edgar A. Girard (1964)
Crane Flat campground
east end loop D
6043 Comfort station
Edgar A. Girard (1964)
Crane Flat campground
loop E
6100 Residence - Cuneo
Cuneo (1940)
Carl Inn, near
Hodgdon Meadow
on old Big Oak
Flat Road
6110 Entrance kiosk, east
NPS (1966)
Hodgdon Meadow -
new Big Oak Flat
Road entrance
6111 Entrance kiosk, west
NPS (1966)
Hodgdon Meadow -
new Big Oak Flat
Road entrance
6112 Entrance office
NPS (1966)
Hodgdon Meadow -
new Big Oak Flat
Road entrance
6113 Comfort station
NPS (1966)
Hodgdon Meadow -
new Big Oak Flat
Road entrance
6114 4-unit apartment
NPS (1966)
Hodgdon res. area
6118 Residence
NPS (1966)
Hodgdon res. area
1st on right
6119 Residence
NPS (1966)
Hodgdon res. area
2d on right
6120 Residence
NPS (1966)
Hodgdon res. area
3d on right
6121 Residence
NPS (1966)
Hodgdon res. area
4th on right
6123 Utility building
NPS (1966)
Hodgdon Meadow
near res. area
6124 Comfort station
Varringer & Betke (1964)
Hodgdon Meadow
campground
6125 Comfort station
Varringer & Betke (1964)
Hodgdon Meadow
south end
6126 Bathhouse
(n. d.)
Hodgdon Meadow
res. area
6127 Tent platform
(n. d.)
Hodgdon Meadow
res. area
6128 Fire barracks
NPS (1969)
Hodgdon Meadow
6129 Office & contact station
(1966?)
New Big Oak Flat
Road entrance area
6130-6135 Tent houses
NPS (1968)
Hodgdon Meadow
6136 Mather District Office
NPS (1970)
New Big Oak Flat
Road entrance
6137 Bathhouse
NPS (n. d.)
Hodgdon Meadow

I. Crane Flat to White Wolf

6200 NR Ranger station
NPS (1934)
Merced Grove
6202 * Fire lookout
NPS (1931)
Crane Flat
HS-03 * Gin Flat cabin
(1883); walls stabilized 1961
Gin Flat
Tack shed
(n. d.)
Harden Lake
6220 Tent platform - double White Wolf
campground
6251 Pumphouse
NPS (n. d.)
White Wolf
6252 Comfort station
Malven & Nicklas (1958)
White Wolf campground,
east end
6253 Comfort station
Malven & Nicklas (1958)
White Wolf campground,
center
6254 Comfort station
Malven & Nicklas (1958)
White Wolf campground,
west end
6255 Tent platform - double
(NPS (1959)
White Wolf campground,
rangers
6256 Tent platform - double White Wolf campground,
naturalists
6257 Tent platform - double White Wolf campground,
sanitation
6301 NR-’87 Lodge
Meyers (ca. 1927)
White Wolf
6302 NR-’87 Guest cabin
Meyers (ca. 1927)
White Wolf
6303 NR-’87 Guest cabin
Meyers (ca. 1927)
White Wolf
6304 NR-’87 Storage
Meyers (ca. 1927)
White Wolf
6312 NR-’87 Linen room
Meyers (ca. 1930); original
soda fountain
White Wolf
6313 NR-’87 Saddle shelter
Meyer (ca. 1930)
White Wolf
no # Sewage plant
NPS (ca. 1974)
White Wolf

J. Other Properties


[1. Hetch Hetchy]
No #s Dormitory
Owned, constructed by City of
San Francisco
Lake Eleanor
2-stall garage
Owned, constructed by City of
San Francisco (1948)
Lake Eleanor
Reservoir keeper’s cottage
Owned, constructed by City of
San Francisco (1948)
Lake Eleanor
* Lake Eleanor Dam
Owned, constructed by
City of San Francisco (1918)
Lake Eleanor
Camp house
Owned by City of San Francisco
constructed by San Francisco PUC
(1951)
O’Shaughnessy Dam,
Hetch Hetchy Valley
* O’Shaughnessy Dam
Owned, constructed by
City of San Francisco (1923;
raised in 1938)
Hetch Hetchy
Reservoir

2. Yosemite Valley
HS-14 NR Diversion dam
NPS (1917)
Cascades
HS-19 NR-’87 Wawona tunnel
NPS (1930-33)
Yosemite Valley
Wawona Road
NR Ahwahnee Hotel
YP&CC (1925)
Yosemite Valley
Bridges Yosemite Valley
P-001 NR Pohono (1938)
P-003 NR Yosemite Creek (1922)
P-005 NR Stoneman (1933)
P-006 NR Ahwanhee (1928) (Kenneyville #1)
P-007 NR Sugar Pine (1928) (Kenneyville #2)
P-008 NR Clark’s (1928)
P-009 NR Happy Isles (1929)
P-010 NR Tenaya Creek (1928)
Camp 16-7 (1929)
El Capitan (1933)
Arch Rock footbridge (1934)
NR-’87 Vernal Fall (1929)
Silver Apron (1950s) (older stone abutments)

Other bridges in the valley for which numbers were not found include:
on the Merced River
Happy Isles foot bridges—West Fork,
Middle Fork, East Fork
Curry Housekeeping Bridge
Sentinel Bridge
Swinging Bridge
Old Village Bridge
on Tenaya Creek
Tenaya Cascade Bridge
Snow Creek Bridge
Mirror Lake Bridge
Tenaya Creek Stable Bridge
on Indian Creek
Lewis Clinic Foot Bridge
North Drive Bridge
Tecoya Dorm Bridge
Tecoya Garage Foot Bridge North
Tecoya Garage Foot Bridge South
Tecoya Road Bridge South
Indian Creek Road Bridge
Indian Creek Horse Bridge
on Royal Arch Creek
Pump House Bridge
on Yosemite Creek
Lost Arrow Creek Bridge
Yosemite Fall Foot Bridge
Lost Arrow Horse Bridges #2-7
All-Year Highway Bridge
The Yosemite Fall trail bridge at the top of the Upper Fall is the last truss bridge still in use on Yosemite trails. It was built in the 1920s, with new timbers installed on the original pattern in the 1950s. It will be included in the Yosemite Fall Trail National Register nomination.
NR McCauley barn
McCauley (1883)
Big Meadow
NR Saltbox barn
Meyer (1880s)
Big Meadow
NR Cribwork barn
Meyer (late 1870s)
Big Meadow

4. Wawona
HS-08 Stella Lake ice reservoir
Wawona Hotel Co. (1886)
Wawona
HS-13 Chilnualna Fall ranger
patrol cabin (ca. 1930)
Wawona
HS-16 NR Great Sierra Mine equipment
(from Great Sierra Mine HS)
Wawona (YPHC)
HS-17 Arboretum wall
USA (1904)
Wawona
HS-18 NR? Covered bridge
Clark, Washburn (1858 & 1875)
Wawona
South Fork Merced River bridge
NPS (1931)
Wawona

5. Tuolumne Meadows
HS-02 * Dana Fork cabin Tuolumne Meadows
(Note: all Golden Crown Mine structures nominated to National Register, status uncertain)
HS-04A NR Golden Crown Mine Cabin 1
(1879)
Tuolumne Meadows
HS-04B NR Golden Crown Mine Cabin 2
(1879)
Tuolumne Meadows
HS-04C NR Golden Crown Mine Cabin 3
(1879)
Tuolumne Meadows
HS-04D NR Golden Crown Mine Cabin 4
(1879)
Tuolumne Meadows
HS-04E NR Golden Crown Mine Shaft 1
(1879)
Tuolumne Meadows
HS-04F NR Golden Crown Mine Shaft 2
(1879)
Tuolumne Meadows
HS-05A NR Great Sierra structure 1
(1881)
Tuolumne Meadows
HS-05B NR Great Sierra structure 2
(1881)
Tuolumne Meadows
HS-05C NR Great Sierra structure 3
(1881)
Tuolumne Meadows
HS-05D NR Great Sierra structure 4
(1881)
Tuolumne Meadows
HS-05E NR Great Sierra structure 5
(1881)
Tuolumne Meadows
HS-05F NR Great Sierra Dana Cabin
(1881)
Tuolumne Meadows
HS-05G NR Great Sierra Shaft 1
(1881)
Tuolumne Meadows
HS-05H NR Great Sierra Shaft 2
(1881)
Tuolumne Meadows
HS-06 * Prospector’s cabin
(n. d.)
Tuolumne Meadows
HS-07 NR Soda Springs Enclosure
Lembert (1889)
Tuolumne Meadows
HS-12 * Mono Pass trail cabin
(Dana Fork Cabin)
(n. d.)
Tuolumne Meadows


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